Other Location Restrictions in Alabama

Alabama prohibits any person from possessing a firearm while participating in or attending any demonstration held at a public place.1 It is also unlawful for any person to possess a firearm within 1,000 feet of a demonstration at a public place, after having been ordered by a law enforcement officer to remove himself or herself from the proscribed area.2

Alabama prohibits the carrying of a handgun on premises that are not owned or under the control of the possessor unless the person carries the handgun pursuant to a valid concealed handgun license.3 The possession of a firearm within any wildlife management area without a valid permit allowing this privilege is also prohibited.4

Effective September 1, 2015, people, including individuals with concealed handgun licenses, are prohibited from possessing firearms without the express permission of the person having authority over the premises in:

  • A jail, prison or other certain other corrections facilities;
  • A facility providing inpatient or custodial care of those with psychiatric, mental, or emotional disorders; or
  • A building where a county commission or city council is currently having a meeting.5

People are prohibited from possessing firearms at the following locations unless (1) the person has the permission of someone having authority over the premises or (2) the firearms are kept from ordinary observation and locked within a compartment or in the interior of the person’s vehicle or in a compartment or container securely affixed to the vehicle:

  • A police, sheriff or highway patrol station;
  • A courthouse or building in which a District Attorney’s office is located;
  • A facility hosting an athletic event sponsored by a private or public elementary or secondary school, or any private or public postsecondary education institution. Concealed handgun license holders, however, may carry on the premises with permission by the owner or person in charge;
  • A facility hosting a professional athletic event. Concealed handgun license holders, however, may carry on the premises with permission by the owner or person in charge; or
  • A building or facility to which access of unauthorized persons and prohibited articles is limited during normal hours of operation by the continuous posting of guards and the use of other security features.6

Additionally, in 2011, both houses of the state legislature adopted a resolution prohibiting individuals—including concealed handgun license holders—from possessing a firearm at the Alabama State House.7.

Alabama has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.

 

Notes
  1. Ala. Code § 13A-11-59(b). ⤴︎
  2. Ala. Code § 13A-11-59(c). ⤴︎
  3. Ala. Code § 13A-11-52. ⤴︎
  4. Ala. Code § 9-11-304. ⤴︎
  5. Ala. Code § 13A-11-61.2. ⤴︎
  6. Id. ⤴︎
  7. 2011 AL OHJR 9 ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Alaska

A concealed weapons permit holder in Alaska may not carry a concealed handgun “anywhere a person is prohibited from possessing a handgun under state or federal law.”1

The state prohibits any person from knowingly carrying a concealed weapon in the residence of another without his or her permission.2

Alaska generally prohibits the knowing possession of a loaded firearm, carried openly or concealed, in any location where liquor is sold for consumption on the premises.3 It is an affirmative defense, however, if: 1) the loaded firearm is a handgun that is covered or enclosed so that an observer cannot determine that it is a handgun without removing it from, or opening, that which covers or encloses it; and 2) the possession occurred at a restaurant and the defendant did not consume intoxicating liquor.4

Alaska prohibits the knowing possession of a firearm carried openly or concealed by any person within:

  • The grounds of, or on a parking lot immediately adjacent to, a child care center (other than a private residence);
  • A courtroom or office of the Alaska Court System, or a courthouse that is occupied only by the Alaska Court System and other justice-related agencies; or
  • A domestic violence or sexual assault shelter that receives funding from the state.5

Alaska has no statute prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Alaska Stat. § 18.65.755(a)(2). ⤴︎
  2. Alaska Stat. § 11.61.220(a)(1)(B). ⤴︎
  3. Alaska Stat. § 11.61.220(a)(2). ⤴︎
  4. Alaska Stat. § 11.61.220(d). ⤴︎
  5. Alaska Stat. § 11.61.220(a)(4). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Arizona

In 2009, Arizona enacted a law allowing concealed weapons permit holders to carry handguns into the premises of a licensed bar or restaurant that serves alcohol unless the alcohol licensee has posted a sign that clearly prohibits the possession of weapons on the licensed premises. The sign must meet certain requirements.1

This law was subsequently amended in 20132 to eliminate the concealed weapons permit requirement for carrying a concealed handgun into the premises of an alcohol licensee. Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 4-229(A) now states, “A person may carry a concealed handgun on the premises of a [bar or restaurant licensed to serve alcohol] unless the licensee posts a sign that clearly prohibits the possession of weapons on the licensed premises.”

Note, however, that Arizona’s laws on this matter appear contradictory. Arizona lawmakers have not amended Section 4-244(29), which still states that it is generally unlawful for a person other than a peace officer (whether on duty or off duty) or the owner or authorized employee of an alcohol licensee “to be in possession of a firearm while on the licensed [business’] premises,” except in the case of “a person with a permit issued pursuant to [the CCW permitting law] who carries a concealed handgun on the licensed premises. . . .”  Section 4-244(30) also still makes it generally unlawful for the owner or employee of such alcohol licensees to knowingly permit a person in possession of a firearm to remain on the business’ premises, except if the person is a peace officer (whether on duty or off duty) or “a person with a permit issued pursuant to [the CCW permitting law]. . . .”

Notwithstanding these contradictions, Arizona law does prohibit anyone, including a concealed weapons permit holder, from consuming alcohol while in possession of a firearm on the premises of an alcohol licensee business.3

Arizona law also prohibits possession of a firearm:

  • In an election polling place on the day of any election;4
  • On the person or within the immediate control of any person in a nuclear or hydroelectric generating station;5
  • In any “public establishment,” or while attending any “public event,” after a reasonable request to remove the weapon and place it in the custody of the operator of the establishment or sponsor of the event for temporary and secure storage.6 (“Public establishment” means a structure, vehicle or craft owned, leased or operated by the state or a political subdivision.7 “Public event” means an event of limited duration conducted by a public entity or a private entity with a permit or license granted by a public entity);8 or
  • On the grounds of a jail or correctional facility or a secure care facility under the jurisdiction of the Department of Juvenile Corrections.9

State administrative regulations may prohibit the carrying of firearms in additional locations.

 

Notes
  1. 2009 Ariz. ALS 175 §§ 2, 3, codified as Ariz. Rev. Stat. §§ 4-229(A), (B), (E), 4-244(29)(C), (30)(C). The department of liquor licenses and control prepares the signs and makes them available at no cost to licensees. Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 4-229(D). The law also provides affirmative defenses if:
    • The person was not informed of the notice prior to the violation;
    • The sign had fallen down at the time of the violation; or
    • At the time of the violation, the sign had been posted for thirty days or less.  Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 4-229(C). ⤴︎
  2. See 2014 Ariz. ALS 253 § 25. ⤴︎
  3. 2009 Ariz. ALS 175 § 3 (codified as Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 4-244(31). This section has a minor exception to permit “the consumption of small amounts of spirituous liquor by an undercover peace officer on assignment to investigate the licensed establishment.” ⤴︎
  4. Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-3102(A)(11). ⤴︎
  5. Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-3102(A)(11). ⤴︎
  6. Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-3102(A)(10). Unless the operator or sponsor is licensed to manufacture, sell, or deal in liquor, the storage must be readily accessible on entry and allow for the immediate retrieval of the weapon on exit from the establishment or event. Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-3102.01. ⤴︎
  7. Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-3102(M)(2). ⤴︎
  8. Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-3102(M)(3). ⤴︎
  9. Ariz. Rev. Stat. §§ 13-2505, 13-2514, 31-129. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Arkansas

Under a law enacted in 2017 (and effective September 1, 2017),1 CCW license holders may complete a one-time training course approved by the Director of the Arkansas State Police to obtain a “concealed carry endorsement” authorizing such individuals to carry loaded firearms in a variety of otherwise restricted public buildings and facilities, including public college or university campus buildings and the State Capitol.2 This law also compels various private establishments (including houses of worship, bars, liquor stores, and other establishments that serve alcohol), to allow CCW holders with a concealed carry endorsement to carry concealed handguns in their premises, unless the establishment provides written or verbal notice, as prescribed, that concealed carry is prohibited.3

However, all CCW holders are still generally prohibited from carrying loaded firearms on the grounds of public K-12 or pre-kindergarten schools, courtrooms, locations where an administrative hearing is being conducted by a state agency, or facilities operated by the Department of Correction, or the Department of Community Correction, or residential treatment facilities owned or operated by the division of Youth Services of the Department of Human Services,4 unless they are carrying the handgun while in their motor vehicle or unless the handgun is kept in a locked motor vehicle in a publicly owned and maintained parking lot.5 The Arkansas State Hospital and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences may submit security plans to the State Police to obtain permission to designate certain sensitive areas off-limit to firearms, and colleges and universities may do the same while hosting or sponsoring collegiate athletic events, as specified.6

CCW holders without a concealed carry enhancement, and people without a CCW license, are generally not authorized to carry concealed handguns into:

  • Any police, sheriff’s, state police or highway police station or facility;
  • Any buildings of the Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department, or onto grounds adjacent to such buildings (except rest areas, weigh stations and public parking areas);
  • Any meeting place of “the governing body of any governmental entity” or any meeting of the legislature or a committee thereof;
  • Any state office;
  • Any athletic event not related to firearms;
  • Any portion of an establishment, except a restaurant, licensed to dispense alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises or where beer or light wine is consumed on the premises;7
  • The passenger terminal of any airport (except that no person shall be prohibited from carrying any legal firearm into the terminal if the firearm is encased for shipment for purposes of checking such firearm as baggage to be lawfully transported on any aircraft);
  • Any church or other place of worship unless the head of the place of worship has given permission;
  • Any place where the carrying of firearms is prohibited by federal law;
  • Any place where a parade or demonstration requiring a permit is being held, if the licensee is a participant in the parade or demonstration; or
  • Any place at the discretion of the person or entity exercising control over the physical location, by displaying a written notice “clearly readable” at a distance of not less than ten feet, and posted at each entrance to the location, stating that “carrying a handgun is prohibited.” A written notice is not required for private homes, and any licensee entering a private home must notify the occupants that he or she is carrying a concealed handgun.8

Arkansas prohibits a person who is not licensed to carry a concealed weapon from possession of any loaded center-fire weapon, other than a shotgun, and other than in a residence or business of the owner, in certain parts of: Baxter County, Benton County, Carroll County, Conway County, Garland County, Marion County, and platted subdivisions located in unincorporated areas.9

A person who has been issued a permit to manufacture or sell alcoholic beverages will be assessed a fine for possession of a weapon on the permitted premises by a person without a possessory or proprietary interest in those premises.  An employee of a retail liquor store for consumption off the premises who is licensed to carry a concealed weapon may possess a handgun on the premises.10

Notes
  1. 2017 AR HB 1249, Section 8. See also, 2017 AR SB 724. ⤴︎
  2. Ark. Code Ann. §§ 5-73-122(a)(3)(D), 5-73-322. ⤴︎
  3. Ark. Code Ann. § 5-73-306(11), (12), (15), (18), (19). ⤴︎
  4. Ark. Code Ann. §§ 5-73-122(a)(3)(D). ⤴︎
  5. Ark. Code Ann. § 5-73-122(a)(3)(C). This does not apply to parking lots owned by the Department of Correction, the Department of Community Correction, and the parking lots of residential treatment facilities owned or operated by the Division of Youth Services of the Department of Human Services. ⤴︎
  6. Ark. Code Ann. §§ 5-73-101(11), 5-73-122(3)(D)(iv), 5-73-306(20), 5-73-325. ⤴︎
  7. See Ark. Code Ann. § 3-9-402. ⤴︎
  8. Ark. Code Ann. § 5-73-306. ⤴︎
  9. Ark. Code Ann. § 5-73-127. ⤴︎
  10. Ark. Code Ann. § 3-4-403. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in California

A U.S. citizen or legal resident over age 18 may carry a handgun anywhere within his or her place of residence, place of business, or on private property owned or lawfully possessed by the citizen or legal resident.1 A permit or license is not required for a person to carry within these locations.2

California law prohibits any person from carrying a loaded firearm (open or concealed) on his or her person or in a motor vehicle in the following locations:

  • In any public place or on any public street in an incorporated city, or
  • In any public place or on any public street in unincorporated territory if it is unlawful to discharge a weapon in that location.3

This prohibition is subject to certain exceptions, including those for:

  • A concealed weapons licensee who is carrying a loaded handgun;4
  • A person who has been granted a license to carry a loaded and exposed handgun if he or she is in the county that granted the license;5 or
  • A person who reasonably believes that his or her person or property or the person or property of another is in immediate, grave danger and that the carrying of the weapon is necessary for the preservation of that person or property.6

A firearm is considered “loaded” in this context if it has a cartridge or shell in a chamber, clip or magazines that is in or attached to the firearm.7

California law prohibits any person from carrying an exposed and unloaded handgun in a public place or public street, if the place or street is in an incorporated city or city and county, or if it is otherwise unlawful to discharge a weapon in that location. See the Open Carrying in California section for further information.

The state prohibits any person, even a concealed weapons licensee, from carrying a concealed handgun or a loaded firearm, upon his or her person or within any vehicle, while engaged in picketing or other informational activities in a public place relating to a concerted refusal to work.8

California generally prohibits carrying or possession of a firearm in the following locations, although concealed weapons licensees are exempt from these prohibitions:

  • In any state or local public building or at any public meeting.9
  • In the California State Parks system.10

Under a law that California enacted in 2010, it is unlawful for any person to knowingly possess a firearm within the sterile area of a public transit facility, if the sterile area is posted with a statement providing reasonable notice of the prohibition.11 “Sterile area” means any portion of a public transit facility that is generally controlled in a manner consistent with the public transit authority’s security plan.12 This prohibition does not apply to certain specified law enforcement personnel or to persons licensed to carry a concealed weapon.13

California also generally prohibits carrying or possession of a firearm in the following locations:

  • In the State Capitol, any legislative office, any office of the Governor or other constitutional officer, or any hearing room in which any committee of the Senate or Assembly is conducting a hearing, or upon the grounds of the State Capitol, which is bounded by 10th, L, 15th, and N Streets in the City of Sacramento, if the firearm is loaded, or the area is posted with a statement providing reasonable notice that prosecution may result from possession of a firearm.14
  • In or on the grounds of the Governor’s Mansion or any other residence of the Governor, the residence of any other constitutional officer, or the residence of any Member of the Legislature, if the firearm is loaded.15

California also prohibits any person, including a concealed weapons licensee, from possessing a firearm at a polling place,16 or in the buildings or on the grounds of the “Cal Expo” center in Sacramento.17

California administrative regulations may require additional locations to be firearms-free.

A concealed carry license may include any reasonable restrictions or conditions which the issuing authority deems warranted, including restrictions as to the place where the person may carry a firearm.18

Finally, under California law, it is unlawful to hunt, or to discharge while hunting, any firearm within 150 yards of any occupied dwelling house, residence, or other building, except for the owner or person in possession of the premises, or with the express permission of the owner or person in possession of the premises. It is also unlawful to intentionally discharge any firearm over or across any public road or other established way open to the public in an unsafe and reckless manner.19

 

Notes
  1. Cal. Penal Code § 25605(a). ⤴︎
  2. Cal. Penal Code §§ 25605(b), 26035. ⤴︎
  3. Cal. Penal Code §§ 17030, 25850(a). ⤴︎
  4. Cal. Penal Code § 26010. ⤴︎
  5. Cal. Penal Code §§ 26150, 26155. Only certain counties are authorized to grant this type of license, based on county population. See the Open Carrying in California section for further information. ⤴︎
  6. Cal. Penal Code § 26045. ⤴︎
  7. Cal. Penal Code § 16840(b). A California law authorizes peace officers to examine any firearm carried by anyone on his or her person in any public place in an incorporated city or area of an unincorporated territory where it is unlawful to discharge a weapon, to determine whether the firearm is loaded. Cal. Penal Code § 25850(b). ⤴︎
  8. Cal. Penal Code § 17510(a). The exceptions regarding carrying concealed firearms under Cal. Penal Code §§ 25450-25475, 25615-25655 (provided for peace officers, bank guards, armored vehicle guards, licensed hunters or fishermen, private investigators, and certain other persons) do not apply if these persons are engaged in picketing activities. Cal. Penal Code § 17510(c). ⤴︎
  9. Cal. Penal Code § 171b(a)(1), (b)(3). ⤴︎
  10. Cal. Code Regs. tit. 14, § 4313(a). This prohibition does not apply to the use of weapons permitted by law or regulation to be used for hunting in any unit of the state park system open to hunting. Cal. Code Regs. tit. 14, § 4313(b). Firearms that do not have a cartridge in any portion of the mechanism, or other unloaded weapons, may be possessed within temporary lodging or a mechanical mode of conveyance when such weapons are rendered temporarily inoperable or are packed, cased, or stored in a manner that will prevent their ready use. Cal. Code Regs. tit. 14, § 4313(c). ⤴︎
  11. Cal. Penal Code § 171.7(b)(1). ⤴︎
  12. Cal. Penal Code § 171.7(a)(2). ⤴︎
  13. Cal. Penal Code §§ 171.7(c), 25655. ⤴︎
  14. Cal. Penal Code § 171c(a)(1)(A), (a)(2)(A). ⤴︎
  15. Cal. Penal Code § 171d. ⤴︎
  16. Cal. Elec. Code § 18544(a) There are limited exceptions, including for peace officers either conducting official business or casting a vote. Cal. Elec. Code § 18544(b). ⤴︎
  17. Cal. Code Regs. tit. 14, § 4955. ⤴︎
  18. Cal. Penal Code § 26200(a). ⤴︎
  19. Cal. Fish and Game Code § 3004. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Colorado

Except for concealed carry permit holders, no person may possess a firearm in a building in Colorado in which the chambers, galleries, or offices of the state general assembly or any member, officer, or employee of the general assembly are located, or in which a legislative hearing or meeting is taking place.1

Local governments may enact regulations prohibiting open carrying of firearms in a building or specific area within the local government’s jurisdiction, as long as signs are posted to that effect.2

No person, regardless of a permit to carry a concealed handgun, may carry a concealed handgun into a public building at which security personnel and electronic screening devices are permanently in place at each entrance, each person entering the building is screened, and persons carrying weapons are required to leave them with security while in the building.3

Colorado prohibits any person from possessing, without legal authority, a loaded firearm in, or carrying or bringing a loaded firearm into, any public transportation facility.4

Please see the page on Guns in Schools in Colorado for additional relevant laws.

Colorado has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Colo. Rev. Stat. § 18-12-105(1)(c). ⤴︎
  2. Colo. Rev. Stat. § 29-11.7-104. ⤴︎
  3. Colo. Rev. Stat. § 18-12-214(4). ⤴︎
  4. Colo. Rev. Stat. § 18-9-118. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Connecticut

A permit to carry a handgun does not authorize a person to carry a handgun on any premises where the possession or carrying of a handgun is prohibited by the person who owns or controls the premises.1

Connecticut prohibits any person from possessing a weapon from which a shot may be discharged, either loaded or unloaded, within any building where:

  • Either house of the General Assembly is located;
  • Any committee, member, officer or employee of the General Assembly has an official office; or
  • Any committee of the General Assembly is holding a public hearing.2

Connecticut has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 29-28(e). ⤴︎
  2. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 2-1e(c). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Delaware

Delaware prohibits knowingly and unlawfully introducing contraband into a detention facility.1 The state also prohibits a person confined in a detention facility from knowingly and unlawfully making, obtaining, or possessing contraband.2 In addition, Delaware prohibits furnishing a deadly weapon to any person committed to the jurisdiction of the State Department of Corrections.3

Delaware has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Del. Code Ann. tit. 11, § 1256(1). Contraband is defined by Del. Code Ann. tit. 11, § 1258(3) to include firearms. ⤴︎
  2. A “detention facility” is any place used to confine a person charged with or convicted of an offense or pursuant to court order. Del. Code Ann. tit. 11, § 1258. ⤴︎
  3. Del. Code Ann. tit. 11, § 6562A(3). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Florida

A Florida license to carry a concealed firearm does not authorize a person to openly carry a handgun or carry a concealed firearm into:1

  • Any place of nuisance;2
  • Any police, sheriff, or highway patrol station;
  • Any detention facility, prison, or jail;3
  • Any courthouse or courtroom, except that nothing precludes a judge from carrying a concealed weapon or determining who may carry a concealed weapon in his or her courtroom;
  • Any polling place;
  • Any meeting of the Legislature or a committee thereof, or any meeting of the governing body of a county, public school district, municipality, or special district;
  • Any career center;
  • Any portion of an establishment licensed to dispense alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises, which portion of the establishment is primarily devoted to such purpose;
  • Inside the passenger terminal and sterile area of any airport, provided that no person shall be prohibited from carrying any legal firearm into the terminal, if the firearm is encased for shipment for purposes of checking as baggage to be lawfully transported on any aircraft;
  • Any place where the carrying of firearms is prohibited by federal law.

See the Florida Guns in Schools section above for Florida’s broad restrictions on guns in schools.

Florida law also prohibits introducing firearms into, and sending firearms from, any hospital providing mental health services; it also prohibits transmitting firearms to any patient of such a hospital outside the grounds of the hospital.4

Finally, Florida prohibits possession of a concealed firearm within a pharmacy, but this law explicitly exempts concealed firearms licensees.5

Florida has no statute prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Places of worship;
  • Sports arenas; or
  • Gambling facilities.
Notes
  1. Fla. Stat. § 790.06(12). ⤴︎
  2. See Fla. Stat. § 823.05. ⤴︎
  3. Regarding correctional institutions and juvenile detention facilities and commitment programs, see also Fla. Stat. §§ 944.47(1)(a)(5) and 985.711(1)(a)(4), respectively. ⤴︎
  4. Fla. Stat. § 394.458. See also Fla. Stat. § 916.1085. ⤴︎
  5. Fla. Stat. § 790.145. This law also does not apply to employees of the pharmacy who are authorized by the owner, operator, or manager to carry a firearm. Id. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Georgia

Georgia law generally prohibits carrying a firearm:

  • In parks, historic sites, and recreational areas;1
  • Within 150 feet of any polling place although an exception may apply for concealed carry permittees entering government buildings when they are open for business and where ingress into such buildings is not restricted or screened by security personnel.;2
  • Within an airport terminal;3
  • In a government building, courthouse, jail, prison, or place of worship; or
  • In a state mental health facility that admits individuals on an involuntary basis for treatment of mental illness, developmental disability; or addictive disease.

However, “weapon carry” license holders are exempt from many of these restrictions.  These location restrictions do not apply, to a firearm possessed by a license holder if the firearm is under the license holder’s control in a motor vehicle or is in a locked compartment, container, or firearms rack in or on a motor vehicle parked in parking facility.4 A person with a valid license may also carry a handgun in parks, historic sites, and recreational areas, including in all publicly owned buildings located in such areas, and in wildlife management areas, and on public transportation, except where prohibited by federal law.5 Georgia also authorizes in airport terminals and aircraft, except where prohibited by federal law.6 It authorizes the governing body or authority of a place of worship to permit the carrying of weapons or long guns by license holders.7. And it authorizes a license holder to carry a weapon in a government building if the building is open for business and “where ingress into such building is not restricted or screened by security personnel.”8

A law Georgia enacted in 2010 repealed several stronger restrictions, including a provision prohibiting a license holder from consuming alcoholic beverages in a restaurant or other eating establishment while carrying a firearm, and a provision prohibiting the carrying of firearms at “public gatherings” defined to include athletic and sporting events and political rallies and functions.  In 2014, Georgia enacted a law allowing individuals to carry firearms in bars.9

Private property owners and persons in legal control of property through a lease, rental agreement, licensing agreement, contract or other agreement to control access to property generally have the right to forbid possession of a firearm on their property.10

In addition, regarding wildlife management areas and public fishing areas, Georgia prohibits the possession of:

  • A firearm other than a handgun, during a closed hunting season for that area, unless such firearm is unloaded and stored in a motor vehicle so as not to be readily accessible;
  • A handgun during a closed hunting season for that area unless such person possesses a valid weapons carry license;
  • A loaded firearm other than a handgun, in a motor vehicle during a legal open hunting season for that area; or
  • A loaded handgun in a motor vehicle during a legal open hunting season for that area unless such person possesses a valid weapons carry license.11
Notes
  1. Ga. Code Ann. § 12-3-10(o)(3). ⤴︎
  2. Ga. Code Ann. §§ 21-2-413(i); 16-11-127(b), (e). ⤴︎
  3. Ga. Code Ann. § 16-12-127(a). ⤴︎
  4. Ga. Code Ann. § 16-11-127(d)(3). ⤴︎
  5. Ga. Code Ann. §§ 12-3-10(o), 16-11-126(g). ⤴︎
  6. Ga. Code Ann. § 16-12-127(a). ⤴︎
  7. Ga. Code Ann. § 16-11-127(b)(4). ⤴︎
  8. Ga. Code Ann. § 16-11-127(e)(1). ⤴︎
  9. See 2013 Ga. H.B. 60, amending Ga. Code Ann. §§ 16-11-127(6)(6) and 16-11-130.2. ⤴︎
  10. Ga. Code Ann. § 16-11-127(c). ⤴︎
  11. Ga. Code Ann. §§ 27-3-1.1, 27-4-11.1. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Hawaii

Firearms and ammunition generally must be confined to the possessor’s place of business, residence or sojourn, but the possessor may carry unloaded firearms or ammunition in an enclosed container from the place of purchase to the person’s place of business, residence or sojourn, or between these places upon change of place of business, residence, or sojourn, or between these places and a:

  • Place of repair;
  • Target range;
  • Licensed dealer’s place of business;
  • Organized, scheduled firearms show or exhibit;
  • Place of formal hunter or firearm use training or instruction; or
  • Police station.1

Generally, no person may enter a sterile area, or board or attempt to board an air carrier aircraft while possessing on or about his or her person (including in carry-on baggage) any firearm, explosive or incendiary device.2 This provision makes no exception for concealed weapons license holders.

There are no additional location limits for concealed weapons license holders.

Hawaii has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities;
  • Polling places; or
  • Establishments that serve alcohol.
Notes
  1. Haw. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 134-23(a), 134-24(a), 134-25(a), 134-27(a). ⤴︎
  2. Haw. Code r. § 19-14-3(e). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Idaho

A hotelkeeper has the right to evict a person, whether or not the person is a guest of the hotel, who seeks to bring a firearm into the hotel.1 The hotelkeeper is not required to provide accommodations, facilities or privileges of the hotel to any such person.2

State administrative regulations require any agency that enters into a Medicaid provider agreement with the state for the provision of mental health clinic services to prohibit firearms in the clinic facility.3 In addition, firearms are not allowed in:

  • A children’s residential care facility;4
  • Children’s therapeutic outdoor programs;5 and
  • State veterans’ homes.6

Concealed weapons licensees are prohibited from carrying concealed weapons into any courthouse, juvenile detention facility, or jail, unless they have been authorized to carry a weapon by a person or entity with authority over the building or facility.7 Concealed weapons license holders are also subject to generally applicable location restrictions. For example, licensees generally may not carry a concealed weapon within a student dormitory or residence hall, or within the building of a “public entertainment facility” owned by a college or university (theaters, auditoriums, sports arenas, etc., with a seating capacity of at least 1,000) provided that proper signage is conspicuously posted at each public entrance to the facility notifying attendees of any restriction on the possession of firearms in the facility during the game or event.8

Idaho has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Hospitals;
  • Sports arenas (other than those related to an elementary or secondary school or certain facilities owned by colleges and universities);
  • Gambling facilities;
  • Polling places; or
  • Establishments that serve alcohol.
Notes
  1. Idaho Code Ann. § 39-1805. ⤴︎
  2. Idaho Code Ann. § 39-1809. ⤴︎
  3. Idaho Admin. Code r. 16.03.09.714. ⤴︎
  4. Idaho Admin. Code r. 16.06.02.734. ⤴︎
  5. Idaho Admin. Code r. 16.06.02.848. ⤴︎
  6. Idaho Admin. Code r. 21.01.01.201. ⤴︎
  7. Idaho Code Ann. § 18-3302C; see also Idaho Code Ann. § 18-3302D(4)(f). ⤴︎
  8. Idaho Code Ann. § 18-3309(2). These location restrictions are subject to limited exceptions, including that they do not apply to a person who possesses a firearm in a private vehicle while delivering students, employees or other persons to and from a university, college or public entertainment facility. Id. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Illinois

Illinois generally prohibits the possession of a firearm in or on the real property of a public park, courthouse, any conveyance owned, leased, or contracted by a public transportation agency, or on any public way within 1,000 feet of the real property comprising any school, courthouse or public transportation facility.1 Individuals with concealed handgun permits may, however, store a firearm or ammunition concealed in a case within a locked vehicle or locked container out of plain view within the vehicle in the parking area. A licensee may carry a concealed firearm in the immediate area surrounding his or her vehicle within a prohibited parking lot area only for the limited purpose of storing or retrieving a firearm within the vehicle’s trunk.2

This same law also prohibited the possession of a firearm on any public way within 1,000 feet of a public park.3 However, in 2018, the Illinois Supreme Court determined that the firearm prohibition within 1,000 feet of parks violated the Second Amendment, noting that this requirement “would effectively prohibit the possession of a firearm for self-defense within a vast majority of the acreage in the city of Chicago because there are more than 600 parks in the city.” People v. Chairez, 2018 IL 121417 (Ill. Feb. 1, 2018). The Illinois Supreme Court did not address or rule on the constitutionality of any of Illinois’s other location restrictions.

Illinois also prohibits the carrying or possession of firearms in any location licensed to sell alcoholic beverages or at any public gathering held pursuant to a license issued by any governmental body or any public gathering at which an admission is charged, excluding a place where a showing, demonstration or lecture involving the exhibition of unloaded firearms is conducted.4

Illinois also prohibits a person from boarding or attempting to board any commercial or charter aircraft while knowingly having a firearm in his or her possession. This is punishable as a Class 4 felony.5.

Illinois has no specific statutory gun possession prohibitions in or at:

  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.

Location Restrictions for Concealed Carry Licensees

A concealed carry licensee in Illinois shall not knowingly carry a concealed firearm on or into:6

  • A public or private elementary or secondary school;7
  • A pre-school or child care facility;8
  • Any area under the control of an officer of the executive or legislative branch of government;9
  • Any building designated for matters before a circuit court, appellate court, and/or under the control of the Supreme Court;10
  • Any building under the control of a unit of local government;11
  • An adult or juvenile detention or correctional institution, prison, or jail;12
  • A public or private hospital or hospital affiliate, mental health facility, or nursing home;13
  • Public transportation facilities, buses, trains or other forms of public transportation;14
  • An establishment that serves alcohol on its premises;15
  • Any public gathering or special event conducted on property open to the public that requires the issuance of a permit from the unit of local government;16
  • Any public playground;17
  • Any public park, athletic area, or athletic facility under the control of a municipality or park district;18
  • Any real property under the control of the Cook County Forest Preserve District;19
  • Any public or private community college, college, or university;20
  • Any building, real property, or parking area under the control of a gaming facility licensed under the Riverboat Gambling Act or the Illinois Horse Racing Act of 1975, including an inter-track wagering location licensee;21
  • Any stadium, arena, or the real property or parking area under the control of a stadium, arena, or any collegiate or professional sporting event;22
  • Any public library;23
  • Any airport;24
  • Any amusement park;25
  • Any zoo or museum;26
  • Any street, driveway, parking area, property, building, or facility owned, leased, controlled or used by a nuclear energy, storage, weapons or development site or facility regulated by the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission;27 or
  • Any area where firearms are prohibited under federal law.28
Notes
  1. 720 Ill. Comp. Stat. 5/24-1(c)(1.5). Certain firearms violations, including carrying concealed weapons, use of silencers, sawed-off shotguns, and machine guns, are subject to enhanced penalties when committed in or within 1,000 feet of a school or courthouse. See 720 Ill. Comp. Stat. 5/24-1(c). ⤴︎
  2. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65. ⤴︎
  3. See 720 ILCS 5/24-1(a)(4), (c)(1.5). ⤴︎
  4. 720 Ill. Comp. Stat. 5/24-1(a)(8). ⤴︎
  5. 720 Ill. Comp. Stat. 5/29D-35.1. ⤴︎
  6. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a). ⤴︎
  7. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(1); Includes parking areas. ⤴︎
  8. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(2); Includes parking areas. The operator of a child care facility in a family home may own or possess a firearm if no child under child care at the home is present in the home or the firearm in the home is stored in a locked container when a child under child care at the home is present. ⤴︎
  9. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(3); Includes parking areas. Licensees are not prohibited from carrying a concealed firearm onto the real property, bikeway, or trail in a park regulated by the Department of Natural Resources or any other designated public hunting area or building where firearm possession is permitted. ⤴︎
  10. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(4). ⤴︎
  11. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(5). ⤴︎
  12. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(6); Includes parking areas. ⤴︎
  13. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(7); Includes parking areas. ⤴︎
  14. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(8). ⤴︎
  15. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(9); Includes parking areas. More than 50% of the establishment’s gross receipts within the prior three months must be from the sale of alcohol for it to be a “prohibited area.” The owner of an establishment who knowingly fails to prohibit concealed firearms on its premises or who knowingly makes a false statement or record to avoid the prohibition on concealed firearms is subject to penalty. 235 Ill. Comp. Stat. 5/10-1(c-5). ⤴︎
  16. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(10); This restriction does not apply to a licensee who must walk through a public gathering in order to access his or her residence, place of business, or vehicle. ⤴︎
  17. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(12). ⤴︎
  18. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(13); Licensees are not prohibited from carrying a concealed firearm while on a trail or bikeway if only a portion of the trail or bikeway includes a public park. ⤴︎
  19. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(14). ⤴︎
  20. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(15). ⤴︎
  21. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(16); Includes parking areas. ⤴︎
  22. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(17); Includes parking areas. ⤴︎
  23. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(18); Includes parking areas. ⤴︎
  24. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(19); Includes parking areas. ⤴︎
  25. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(20); Includes parking areas. ⤴︎
  26. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(21); Includes parking areas. ⤴︎
  27. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(22); The licensee shall not under any circumstance store a firearm or ammunition in his or her vehicle or in a compartment or container within a vehicle located anywhere in or on the street, driveway, parking area, property or building at or near such a location regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ⤴︎
  28. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/65(a)(23). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Indiana

No person, including a person with a license to carry a handgun, may possess a firearm:

  • In a commercial or charter aircraft;1
  • In an area of an airport where access is controlled by the inspection of persons and property;2
  • On board a riverboat gambling operation;3
  • On the fairgrounds during the annual state fair;4
  • In or on port areas or port property;5 or
  • In a children’s home or child caring institution run or overseen by Child Welfare Services.6

Indiana has no statutes prohibiting the possession of firearms in the following locations, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;
  • Sports arenas; or
  • Polling places
Notes
  1. Ind. Code Ann. § 35-47-6-1. ⤴︎
  2. Ind. Code Ann. § 35-47-6-1.3. ⤴︎
  3. 68 Ind. Admin. Code 1-7-1. ⤴︎
  4. 80 Ind. Admin. Code 11-2-2(b). Note that any person properly licensed to carry a firearm must secure the firearm in a locked compartment of his or her vehicle, where it will not be visible, per 80 Ind. Admin. Code 11-2-2(d). ⤴︎
  5. See 130 Ind. Admin. Code 4-1-7 and 4-1-8(2). ⤴︎
  6. 465 Ind. Admin. Code 2-9-80(b)(3); 465 Ind. Admin. Code 2-10-79(b)(3); 465 Ind. Admin. Code 2-11-80(b)(3); 465 Ind. Admin. Code 2-12-78(b)(3); 465 Ind. Admin. Code 2-13-77(b)(3). In addition, child care centers must prominently post in places regularly viewed by parents, prohibitions against the use or possession of firearms, unless such possession is required as a condition of employment. 470 Ind. Admin Code 3-4.7-19(a)(5)(C). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Iowa

Any person who is armed with a handgun, or any other firearm that is loaded, whether concealed or not, within the limits of any city is criminally liable for an aggravated misdemeanor.1 This prohibition does not apply to a person who possesses a valid permit to carry firearms, keeps his or her conduct within the limits of that permit, and provides the permit to a peace officer on demand.2 This prohibition also does not apply to the possession of a firearm in a dwelling or place of business, or on land owned or possessed by the person.3 Finally, this prohibition does not apply if the handgun is carried unloaded inside a closed and fastened container or other secure package that is too large to be concealed on the person.4

Iowa prohibits open carry of handguns in the state capitol building and grounds, except by peace officers.5 However, this rule does not apply to concealed carry of handguns. Iowa’s state resources director is not authorized to prohibit “the lawful carrying, transportation, or possession of any pistol or revolver in the capitol building and on the grounds surrounding the capitol building including state parking lots and parking garages by a person who displays to capitol security personnel a valid permit to carry weapons upon request.”6

Iowa has no statutes prohibiting the possession of firearms in the following locations, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Iowa Code § 724.4(1). ⤴︎
  2. Iowa Code § 724.4(4)(i). ⤴︎
  3. Iowa Code § 724.4(4)(a). ⤴︎
  4. Iowa Code § 724.4(4)(e). ⤴︎
  5. Iowa’s state resources director is required to promulgate rules prohibiting the open carry of pistols and revolvers in the state capitol building and the grounds surrounding the capitol building, including state parking lots and parking garages. See Iowa Code § 8A.322(3). ⤴︎
  6. Id. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Kansas

Kansas law states that the carrying of a concealed handgun may not be prohibited in any building unless notices are conspicuously posted in accordance with rules and regulations adopted by the state Attorney General marking the areas as premises where carrying a concealed handgun is prohibited.1

Additionally, Kansas law states that the lawful carrying of a concealed handgun shall not be prohibited in publicly accessible areas of any state or municipal building unless that building also has adequate security measures, including armed personnel and electronic equipment such as metal detectors at all public entrances to detect and restrict the carrying of weapons inside the building.2 These provisions are subject to narrow exceptions, as Kansas law prohibits the possession of a firearm, whether concealed or unconcealed, on the grounds of or within specific state-owned or leased buildings or county courthouses,3 and authorizes certain other public buildings to restrict concealed carry on their premises, including publicly-owned medical care facilities, adult care homes, community mental health centers, and indigent health care clinics.4

The Attorney General’s rules and regulations require, at a minimum, that:

(1) The signs be posted at all exterior entrances to the prohibited buildings;

(2) The signs be posted at eye level of adults using the entrance and not more than 12 inches to the right or left of such entrance;

(3) The signs not be obstructed or altered in any way; and

(4) Signs which become illegible for any reason be immediately replaced.5

The Attorney General has established additional regulations for the posting of these signs.6

Kansas has no statutes prohibiting firearms in parks or hospitals, although administrative regulations may apply.

 

Notes
  1. Kan. Stat. Ann. § 75-7c10(a). ⤴︎
  2. Kan. Stat. Ann. § 75-7c20(a), (b), (m). ⤴︎
  3. Kan. Stat. Ann. § 21-6309. ⤴︎
  4. Kan. Stat. Ann. § 75-7c20(k). ⤴︎
  5. Kan. Stat. Ann. § 75-7c10(i). ⤴︎
  6. See Kan. Admin. Reg. § 16-11-7. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Kentucky

Kentucky law prohibits possession of a loaded firearm in a room where alcoholic beverages are being sold at a retail establishment licensed to sell alcohol “by the drink.”1 This prohibition does not apply to restaurants that are open to the public, have dining facilities for at least 50 people, and receive less than 50 percent of their annual food and beverage income from the sale of alcohol.2

Kentucky law explicitly prohibits a concealed deadly weapon license holder from carrying a concealed firearm into any:

• Police station or sheriff’s office;

• Detention facility, prison or jail;

• Courthouse, solely occupied by the Court of Justice courtroom, or court proceeding;

• Meeting of the governing body of a county, municipality, or special district, or of the General Assembly or a committee of the General Assembly, unless the licensee is a member of that body;

• Portion of an establishment licensed to dispense alcohol for consumption on the premises, where that part of the establishment is primarily devoted to such purpose;

• Elementary or secondary school facility, without the consent of the school authorities;

• Child-care facility, day care center or certified family child-care home, unless the licensee is the owner of a certified family child-care home operated out of his or her residence;

• Area of an airport to which access is controlled by the inspection of persons and property; or

• Place where the carrying of firearms is prohibited by federal law.3

Kentucky law provides that a license holder generally may not carry a concealed deadly weapon into any private business if prohibited by the owner, manager or employer.4 If the carrying of concealed weapons is prohibited in a building or premises open to the public, the employer or business must post signs to that effect. A license holder who carries a concealed deadly weapon into a private business where prohibited may be denied access to, or removed from, the premises. If the license holder is an employee of the business, he or she may be subject to disciplinary measures by his or her employer.5

Units of state, city, county, urban-county, or charter county government may prohibit the carrying of concealed weapons by licensees in portions of buildings actually owned, leased, or occupied by that unit of government.6 Such ordinances must “exempt any building used for public housing by private persons, highway rest areas, firing ranges, and private dwellings owned, leased, or controlled by that unit of government from any restriction on the carrying or possession of deadly weapons.”7 The Kentucky Attorney General has interpreted these provisions to mean that a county legislative body may prohibit or limit the carrying of concealed weapons in buildings in parks or portions of buildings in parks that it owns, leases, or controls. The county judge or executive (the chief elected official of counties in Kentucky) does not qualify as a “legislative body” and thus cannot regulate the carrying of concealed deadly weapons. That authority instead falls to the fiscal court of a county, which is the legislative body of a county.8

Kentucky has no statutes prohibiting firearms in:

• Hospitals;

• Places of worship;

• Sports arenas;

• Gambling facilities; or

• Polling places.

Notes
  1. Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 244.125(1). ⤴︎
  2. Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 244.125(3). ⤴︎
  3. Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 237.110(16). ⤴︎
  4. Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 237.110(17). ⤴︎
  5. Id. ⤴︎
  6. Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 237.115(1), (2). ⤴︎
  7. Id. This section is specifically deemed not to violate the preemption provisions of Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 65.870. Id. However, unless otherwise provided by state or federal law, no criminal penalty may attach to carrying a concealed firearm with a permit at any location at which an unconcealed firearm may constitutionally be carried. Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 237.115(3). ⤴︎
  8. 96 Ky. Op. Att’y Gen. 39, 1996 Ky. AG LEXIS 79. See also 96 Ky. Op. Att’y Gen. 45, 1996 Ky. AG LEXIS 91 (interpreting section 237.115(1) to mean the executive branch of the state government may promulgate an administrative regulation prohibiting those persons licensed to carry concealed deadly weapons from doing so in those portions of buildings owned, leased or occupied by the executive branch). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Louisiana

Louisiana law generally prohibits a person from intentionally carrying a firearm, openly or concealed, while on the premises of an alcoholic beverage outlet, which includes any commercial establishment in which alcoholic beverages are sold in individual servings for consumption on the premises, whether or not such sales are a primary or incidental purpose of the business of the establishment.1  However, this prohibition does not apply to the owner, lessee, or employee of such an outlet, to law enforcement officers, or to a person possessing a firearm in accordance with a concealed handgun permit on the premises of an alcoholic beverage outlet which has been issued a Class A-Restaurant permit.2

Louisiana prohibits people from carrying guns in hospitals, but only if they are prohibited from possessing guns under state or federal law.3

A 2010 Louisiana law explicitly states that a person who lawfully possesses a firearm may possess or transport such firearm within the boundaries of a state park, state historic site, state preservation area, wildlife management area, or wildlife refuge.4

No concealed handgun permit is valid or entitles any permittee to carry a concealed weapon in any facility, building, location, zone, or area in which firearms are banned by state or federal law.5 In addition, no concealed handgun may be carried in any of the following:

  • A law enforcement office, station, or building;
  • A detention facility, prison, or jail;
  • A courthouse or courtroom, provided that a judge may carry such a weapon in his or her own courtroom;
  • A meeting place of the governing authority of a political subdivision;
  • The state capitol building;
  • Any portion of an airport facility where the carrying of firearms is prohibited under federal law, except that no person shall be prohibited from carrying any legal firearm into the terminal, if the firearm is encased for shipment, for the purpose of checking such firearm as lawful baggage;
  • Any church, synagogue, mosque, or other place of worship (unless the entity that owns or has authority over the church, synagogue, or mosque authorizes the concealed handgun permit holder to carry a firearm as a volunteer or paid security guard, after informing the congregation and requiring tactical training if the entity or its insurer chooses to do so)6;
  • A parade or demonstration for which a permit is issued by a governmental entity;
  • Any portion of the permitted area of an establishment that has been granted a permit to sell alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises; or
  • Any school “firearm-free zone,” which generally includes a school campus, any area within 1,000 feet of a school campus, and within a school bus.7

Louisiana prohibits any person carrying or possessing a firearm while present in a polling place, except a peace officer in the performance of his or her official duties.8

These rules do not, however, limit the right of a property owner, lessee, or other lawful custodian to prohibit or restrict access to a person possessing a concealed handgun pursuant to a valid permit. No permittee may carry a concealed handgun into the private residence of another without first receiving the consent of that person.9

Louisiana has no statutes prohibiting firearms in sports arenas or gambling facilities, although administrative regulations may apply.

 

Notes
  1. La. Rev. Stat. § 14:95.5. ⤴︎
  2. La. Rev. Stat. § 14:95.5(C). ⤴︎
  3. 2018 LA SB 76 (signed by the Governor May 23, 2018), amending La. Rev. Stat. § 14:402.1(A). ⤴︎
  4. La. Rev. Stat. § 56:1691). ⤴︎
  5. La. Rev. Stat. § 40:1379.3(M). ⤴︎
  6. 2018 LA SB 402 (signed by the Governor May 23, 2018), amending La. Rev. Stat. §§ 40:1379.3(U)(2) & (5). ⤴︎
  7. La. Rev. Stat. § 40:1379.3(N). ⤴︎
  8. La. Rev. Stat. § 18:1461.7(C)(3). ⤴︎
  9. La. Rev. Stat. § 40:1379.3(O). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Maine

Maine law criminalizes possession of any firearm in an establishment licensed to sell liquor for on-premises consumption if either: 1) the establishment has signs posted that prohibit or restrict the possession of firearms which patrons are likely to see; or 2) a patron possesses a firearm on the premises while under the influence of intoxicating liquor, drugs, a combination of liquor and drugs, or has an excessive alcohol level.1 In addition to the criminal penalty of imprisonment, a court is required, as part of every conviction and sentence for a violation of this provision, to revoke the convict’s permit to carry a concealed handgun, if any.2

With certain limited exceptions, Maine law criminalizes possession of a firearm in a courthouse.3 Maine law specifies that holding a valid permit to carry a concealed handgun is not a defense to a prosecution for unauthorized possession of a firearm in a courthouse.4

Maine law prohibits the use or possession of a firearm in Acadia National Park. This provision is subject to various exceptions, including possession of a gun in a person’s residential dwelling within park lands. Concealed handgun permit holders are also exempt.5

Maine law also prevents the Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands from adopting rules prohibiting concealed handgun permit holders from possessing concealed handguns in buildings and other public property under the Bureau’s jurisdiction.6 This law effectively authorizes permit holders to carry concealed handguns in all state parks and historic sites and in certain national parks and other lands.7

An innkeeper or campground owner may eject from a hotel, lodging house or campground, or may refuse or deny any accommodations, facilities or privileges to, any person the innkeeper or campground owner reasonably believes is bringing in firearms.8

Maine has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Me. Stat., 17-A § 1057(1). ⤴︎
  2. Me. Rev. Stat. tit. 17-A, § 1057(6). Any person convicted of violating section 1057 is not eligible to obtain or apply for a permit to carry a concealed handgun for five years from the date of the conviction. Id. ⤴︎
  3. Me. Rev. Stat., tit. 17-A, § 1058(1). ⤴︎
  4. Me. Rev. Stat., tit. 17-A, § 1058(2-A). ⤴︎
  5. Me. Rev. Stat. tit. 12, § 756. ⤴︎
  6. Me. Stat., 12 § 1803(7). ⤴︎
  7. See Me. Stat., 12 § 1803(1). ⤴︎
  8. Me. Stat., 30-A § 3838(3). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Maryland

Maryland prohibits the possession of a firearm, whether loaded or unloaded, at a demonstration in a public place or in a vehicle within 1,000 feet of such demonstration after law enforcement has:

  • Advised the person that a demonstration is occurring at the public place; and
  • Ordered the person to leave the demonstration area until he or she has disposed of the firearm.1

There is no exception for handgun permit holders.

Regarding handgun possession by permittees, the Secretary of State Police retains the power to further limit the geographic area, circumstances, or times in which the handgun permit is effective.2

Maryland has no statutes prohibiting the possession of firearms with a proper permit in the following locations, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Md. Code Ann., Crim. Law § 4-208. ⤴︎
  2. Md. Code Ann., Pub. Safety § 5-307(b). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Massachusetts

Massachusetts prohibits occupying or attempting to enter or occupy a secure area of an airport or cabin of an airplane knowingly in possession of a firearm, notwithstanding any license to possess the firearm.1

Massachusetts has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following locations, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 269, § 12F(b). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Michigan

Michigan prohibits any person from possessing a firearm, whether concealed or unconcealed, on the premises of any:

  • Depository financial institution or a subsidiary or affiliate of a depository financial institution;
  • Church or other house of religious worship;
  • Court;
  • Theatre;
  • Sports arena;
  • Day care center;
  • Hospital; or
  • Establishment licensed under the Michigan Liquor Control Act.1

These particular location restrictions do not apply to any person licensed to carry a concealed handgun or to a person who possesses a firearm on the premises of one of the entities above if that possession is with the permission of the owner or an agent of the owner of that entity.2

Any person who is licensed to carry a concealed handgun, or a resident of another state licensed by that state to carry a concealed handgun,3 is prohibited from carrying a concealed handgun on the premises of any:4

  • Public or private day care center, public or private child caring agency, or public or private child placing agency;
  • Sports arena or stadium;
  • Licensed bar or tavern where the primary source of income is the sale of alcoholic liquor by the glass and consumed on the premises (though this restriction does not apply to an owner or employee of the business);
  • Property or facility owned or operated by a church, synagogue, mosque, temple or other place of worship, (unless the presiding official or officials of the place of worship permit the carrying of a concealed handgun on that property);
  • Entertainment facility that the individual knows or should know has a seating capacity of 2,500 or more individuals or that has a sign above each public entrance stating in letters not less than one-inch high a seating capacity of 2,500 or more individuals;
  • Hospital; or
  • Dormitory or classroom of a community college, college, or university.

Michigan also prohibits the possession or carrying of, or attempt to possess or carry, any firearm in certain sterile areas of commercial airports.5

An employer may prohibit an employee from carrying a concealed handgun in the course of his or her employment, and a police agency may prohibit an employee from carrying a concealed handgun, if carrying a concealed handgun would result in increased insurance premiums or a loss or reduction of insurance coverage for that employer.6

State administrative regulations may prohibit firearms in additional locations.

 

Notes
  1. Mich. Comp. Laws Serv. § 750.234d(1). ⤴︎
  2. Mich. Comp. Laws Serv. §§ 750.234d(2)(c), (d). ⤴︎
  3. See Mich. Comp. Laws Serv. § 28.432a(1)(h). ⤴︎
  4. Mich. Comp. Laws Serv. § 28.425o(1). ⤴︎
  5. Mich. Comp. Laws Serv. § 259.80f(1)(a). ⤴︎
  6. Mich. Comp. Laws Serv. § 28.425n(2)(b), (3). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Minnesota

Minnesota allows a person carrying a firearm on or about his or her person or clothes under a permit who remains at a private establishment knowing that the operator has made a “reasonable request” that firearms not be brought into the establishment to be ordered to leave the premises.1 A “reasonable request” is defined as a request made in either of two ways:

• The requester may post a readily visible sign, within four feet laterally of every entrance to the establishment with the bottom of the sign at a height of four to six feet above the floor, that states: “(INDICATE IDENTITY OF OPERATOR) BANS GUNS IN THESE PREMISES;”2 or

• The requester must personally inform the person that guns are prohibited in the premises and demand compliance.3

An owner or operator may not prohibit the lawful carrying or possession of firearms in a parking facility or parking area, and a landlord may not restrict the lawful carrying or possession of firearms by tenants or their guests.4

Following its adoption in 2005, Minnesota Statutes § 624.714, subd. 17 (provisions governing the carrying of concealed handguns on private property) was challenged by churches as unconstitutional under article I, section 16, of the Minnesota Constitution, the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, and the federal Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act.5 The churches argued that the following statutory requirements violated their exercise of religion:

• Requiring a church, prior to actually ordering a person possessing a firearm to leave its premises, to:

o Post at every entrance signs that conform to specific requirements; or

o Personally inform each person that guns are prohibited and demand compliance;

• Precluding a church from prohibiting guns in parking areas on church property; and

• Precluding a church from prohibiting their tenants and the guests of tenants from having guns on church property.6

The Hennepin County District Court found in favor of the churches and issued a permanent injunction prohibiting enforcement against the churches of the statutory provisions relating to signage and personal notice, parking areas, and landlords.7 Minnesota appealed this to the state Court of Appeals, which found in favor of the churches, stating that the notice, parking area, and tenant provisions significantly burdened their sincerely held religious beliefs, and the state failed to show that permitting the churches to ban guns on church property was inconsistent with state interests in public safety, travel and providing uniform communication about where guns were prohibited.8

Minnesota law provides that a possessor of any private residence (as opposed to other private establishments) may prohibit firearms, and provide notice thereof, in any lawful manner.9

In Minnesota, no person may carry a firearm within a state game refuge unless the firearm is unloaded and either contained in a case or broken down.10 State administrative regulations apply similar requirements to state parks, forest recreation areas, and wildlife management areas.11

No person may bring a firearm into or possess a firearm in or upon the grounds belonging to or land controlled by any state correctional facility or state hospital without the consent of the chief executive officer.12

Moreover, except for concealed carry permit holders, no person may possess a firearm or ammunition within a courthouse complex or in any state building within the Capitol Area, other than the National Guard Armory, without notifying the sheriff or Commissioner of Public Safety.13 A person who does not have a permit to carry must have the sheriff’s or Commissioner’s express consent.14 This provision does not apply to possession by museums or collectors of art or for other lawful purposes of public exhibition.15

An innkeeper may refuse to admit or refuse service or accommodations to any person the innkeeper reasonably believes is bringing firearms into the hotel.16

A public or private employer may establish policies restricting the carrying or possession of a firearm by its employees while acting in the course and scope of employment.17 An employer may not, however, prohibit any lawful carrying or possession of firearms in a parking facility or parking area.18

State administrative regulations address the possession of firearms in, among other areas:

• Worker’s compensation hearing rooms and offices;19

• Jail facilities;20

• Correctional programs for children;21

• Certain camps and mobile home parks;22

• Scientific and natural areas;23

• Public water access sites;24

• The state capitol area and other state-owned or state-leased property within the Twin Cities metropolitan area as the governor may designate;25

• The grounds of certain licensed horse racing associations;26

• Veterans’ homes;27

• Licensed day care facilities;28

• Adult foster homes;29 or

• Property owned or controlled by the Minnesota Zoological Garden.30

Minnesota has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

• Hospitals;

• Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;

• Sports arenas;

• Most gambling facilities; or

• Polling places.

Note that, generally, loaded long guns are prohibited in public places,31 and a possessor must have a permit to carry a handgun, whether openly or concealed.32

Notes
  1. Minn. Stat. § 624.714, subd. 17(a). ⤴︎
  2. Minn. Stat. § 624.714, subd. 17(b)(1)(i). ⤴︎
  3. Minn. Stat. § 624.714, subd. 17(b)(1)(ii). ⤴︎
  4. Minn. Stat. § 624.714, subd. 17(c), (e). ⤴︎
  5. 42 U.S.C. § 2000cc. ⤴︎
  6. Minn. Stat. 624.714, subd. 17, invalidated in part by Edina Cmty. Lutheran Church v. State, 745 N.W.2d 194, 198-99, 213 (Minn. Ct. App. 2008). ⤴︎
  7. Edina Cmty. Lutheran Church v. State, 745 N.W.2d 194, 198-99, 213 (Minn. Ct. App. 2008). ⤴︎
  8. Id. at 209-10. The court found that the statutory provisions pertaining to exclusion of guns from private property did not constitute “land use regulations” within the meaning of the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act and reversed that part of the district court decision finding Minnesota’s law in violation of the federal law. Id. at 198, 212. ⤴︎
  9. Minn. Stat. § 624.714, subd. 17(d). ⤴︎
  10. Minn. Stat. § 97A.091, subd.1(1). ⤴︎
  11. Minn. R. 6100.0800, subp. 1(A); Minn. R. 6230.0200, subp. 4; Minn. R. 6230.0250, subp. 14. ⤴︎
  12. Minn. Stat. § 243.55, subd. 1. ⤴︎
  13. Minn. Stat. § 609.66, subd. 1g(a), (b)(4). ⤴︎
  14. Id. ⤴︎
  15. Minn. Stat. § 609.66, subd. 2. ⤴︎
  16. Minn. Stat. § 327.73, subd. 2(a)(3). ⤴︎
  17. Minn. Stat. § 624.714, subd. 18(a). ⤴︎
  18. Minn. Stat. § 624.714, subd. 18(c). ⤴︎
  19. Minn. R. 1420.2900, subp. 9. ⤴︎
  20. Minn. R. 2911.5600. ⤴︎
  21. Minn. R. 2960.0360; Minn. R. 2960.0570. ⤴︎
  22. Minn. R. 4630.4500. ⤴︎
  23. Minn. R. 6136.0550, subp. 1(F). ⤴︎
  24. Minn. R. 6218.0100, subp. 3. ⤴︎
  25. Minn. R. 7525.0400(E). ⤴︎
  26. Minn. R. 7897.0100, subp. 3. ⤴︎
  27. Minn. R. 9050.1070, subp. 37. ⤴︎
  28. Minn. R. 9502.0435, subp. 5. ⤴︎
  29. Minn. R. 9555.6225, subp. 10. ⤴︎
  30. Minn. R. 9900.5500. ⤴︎
  31. See Minn. Stat. § 624.7181, subd. 1, subd. 2. ⤴︎
  32. Minn. Stat. § 624.714, subd. 1a. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Mississippi

Mississippi prohibits any person, other than a concealed weapons licensee, from unlawfully possessing at any of the following intellectual disability and illness centers or facilities, or passing to any resident, patient, employee or officer of these centers or facilities, any firearm or deadly weapon:

  • The North Mississippi Regional Center;1
  • The Ellisville State School;2
  • The Boswell Regional Center;3
  • The South Mississippi Regional Center;4
  • The Hudspeth Regional Center;5
  • The North Mississippi State Hospital and South Mississippi State Hospital;6
  • The Central Mississippi Residential Center;7
  • The Specialized Treatment Facility in Harrison County;8 and
  • The Juvenile Rehabilitation Center in Brookhaven.9

Mississippi licenses to carry concealed handguns do not authorize a person to carry a concealed handgun into:

  • Any “place of nuisance”;10
  • Any police, sheriff or highway patrol station;
  • Any detention facility, prison or jail;
  • Any courthouse or courtroom, except that a judge may carrying a concealed weapon and determine who may carry a concealed weapon in a courtroom;
  • Any polling place or meeting place of the governing body of any governmental entity;
  • Any meeting of the Legislature or a legislative committee;
  • Any school, college or professional athletic event not related to firearms;
  • Any portion of an establishment, licensed to dispense alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises, that is primarily devoted to dispensing alcoholic beverages;
  • Any elementary or secondary school facility, and any junior college, community college, college or university facility, unless it is for the purpose of participating in any authorized firearm-related activity;
  • Inside the passenger terminal of any airport, subject to limited exceptions;
  • Any church or other place of worship;
  • Any place where the carrying of firearms is prohibited by federal law; or
  • Any place for which the person or entity exercising control over the location places a written notice clearly readable at a distance of not less than ten feet, stating that the “carrying of a pistol or revolver is prohibited.”11

Additionally, a concealed carry license does not authorize a participant in a parade or demonstration for which a permit is required to carry a concealed handgun.12

However, a concealed handgun licensee who voluntarily completes a firearms safety training course offered by a certified, nationally-recognized organization that normally offers such courses, or by any other organization approved by the DPS, may carry his or her concealed handgun into any of the above-listed locations in which the carrying of concealed weapons is generally prohibited, except that he or she may not carry a concealed weapon into:

  • Any courtroom13 during a judicial proceeding or when otherwise prohibited by a judge;
  • Any place of nuisance;
  • Any police, sheriff, or highway patrol station; or
  • Any detention facility, prison, or jail.14

Note that even license-holders who have completed a firearms safety training course may still be barred from bringing concealed guns onto privately-owned property (including private schools, churches, bars, etc.), if the owner chooses to exclude guns from his or her property.15

Mississippi allows churches and other places of worship to establish a security team and appoint concealed carry permit-holders who are authorized to carry concealed firearms for the protection of the congregation.16 Permit-holders appointed to protect a congregation must have completed a firearms safety training course to serve on the security team.17 Churches and houses of worship are not required to establish such a security team, and like other private property owners, they may still choose to exclude all concealed carry permit-holders from bringing guns onto their property.18

Mississippi has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Sports arenas; or
  • Gambling facilities.
Notes
  1. Miss. Code Ann. § 41-19-15(3). ⤴︎
  2. Miss. Code Ann. § 41-19-116(c). ⤴︎
  3. Miss. Code Ann. § 41-19-211(c). ⤴︎
  4. Miss. Code Ann. § 41-19-155(3). ⤴︎
  5. Miss. Code Ann. § 41-19-243(c). ⤴︎
  6. Miss. Code Ann. § 41-19-261(c). ⤴︎
  7. Miss. Code Ann. § 41-19-279. ⤴︎
  8. Miss. Code Ann. § 41-19-291(7)(c). ⤴︎
  9. Miss. Code Ann. § 41-19-301(7)(c). ⤴︎
  10. Place of nuisance” is defined under Miss. Code Ann. § 95-3-1 as any place where lewdness or prostitution is conducted or permitted or where controlled substances are unlawfully used, possessed, sold or delivered more than once. ⤴︎
  11. Miss. Code Ann. § 45-9-101(13). ⤴︎
  12. Id. ⤴︎
  13. “Courtroom” is defined as: “the actual room in which a judicial proceeding occurs, including any jury room, witness room, judge’s chamber, office housing the judge’s staff, or similar room.” Miss. Code Ann. § 97-37-7. ⤴︎
  14. Miss. Code. Ann. §97-37-7(2). ⤴︎
  15. Op. Miss. Att’y Gen. No. 2013-00023 (Oct. 1, 2013), 2013 Miss. AG LEXIS 248, *8-9 (“An enhanced permit cannot constitutionally take away the rights of property owners to exclude persons from their property if that is their wish. …Therefore, private property owners, including but not limited to owners or custodians of those types of property listed in section 45-9-101(13) (e.g., bars, churches, restaurants serving alcohol, private schools, professional athletic event property) may exclude from their premises persons carrying weapons.”). ⤴︎
  16. 2016 Miss. H.B. 786, signed by the Governor April 15, 2016. ⤴︎
  17. Id. ⤴︎
  18. See Op. Miss. Att’y Gen. No. 2013-00023 (Oct. 1, 2013), 2013 Miss. AG LEXIS 248, *8-9. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Missouri

Effective January 1, 2017, Missouri allows “permitless” concealed carry of firearms into most locations in the state, although it still does issue permits to individuals who wish to obtain them.1 However, concealed carry is still prohibited in a number of locations.  No person (even a concealed carry permit holder) may carry a concealed firearm:

  • Into any police, sheriff, or highway patrol office or station without the consent of the chief law enforcement officer in charge of that office or station;
  • Within 25 feet of any polling place on any election day;
  • Within any adult or juvenile detention facility or correctional institution, prison or jail;
  • In a courthouse solely occupied by the circuit, appellate or supreme court, or any courtrooms, administrative offices, libraries or other rooms of any such court, whether or not such court solely occupies the building. This includes, but is not limited to, any juvenile, family, drug, or other court offices, any room or office wherein any of these courts or offices are temporarily conducting any business within their jurisdictions, and such other locations in such manner as may be specified by supreme court rule;
  • Into any meeting of the governing body of a unit of local government or any meeting of the general assembly or a committee of the general assembly, except that this shall not preclude a member of the body holding a valid concealed carry endorsement from carrying a concealed firearm at a meeting of the body which he or she is a member;
  • In any establishment licensed to dispense intoxicating liquor for consumption on the premises, which portion of the establishment is primarily devoted to that purpose, without the consent of the owner or manager. This provision shall not apply to any bona fide restaurant open to the general public having dining facilities for not less than 50 persons and that receives at least 51% of its gross annual income from the dining facilities by the sale of food. This provision does not authorize any individual who has been issued a concealed carry endorsement to possess a firearm while intoxicated;
  • In any area of an airport to which access is controlled by the inspection of persons and property;
  •  In any place where the carrying of a firearm is prohibited by federal law;
  •  In any portion of a building used as a child care facility without the consent of the manager. This provision does not prohibit the operator of a child care facility in a family home from owning or possessing a firearm or a driver’s license or non-driver’s license containing a concealed carry endorsement;
  •  On any riverboat gambling operation accessible by the public without the consent of the owner or manager pursuant to rules promulgated by the state gaming commission;
  • In any gated area of an amusement park;
  • In any church or other place of religious worship without the consent of the minister or person or persons representing the religious organization who exercise control over the place of religious worship;
  • In or on any private property whose owner has posted the premises as being off-limits to concealed firearms by means of one or more signs displayed in a conspicuous place of a minimum size of 11” by 14” with the writing in letters of not less than one inch. The owner, business or commercial lessee, manager of a private business enterprise, or any other organization, entity, or person may prohibit persons holding a concealed carry endorsement from carrying concealed firearms on the premises, and may prohibit employees, not authorized by the employer, holding a concealed carry endorsement from carrying concealed firearms on the property of the employer. If the building or premises are open to the public, the employer of the business enterprise shall post signs on or about the premises noting that carrying a concealed firearm is prohibited. An employer may prohibit employees or other persons holding a concealed carry endorsement from carrying a concealed firearm in vehicles owned by the employer;
  • Within any sports arena or stadium with a seating capacity of 5,000 or more persons; or
  • Into any hospital accessible by the public.2

Missouri also prohibits any person other than the holder of a valid concealed carry permit or endorsement from possessing a firearm “readily capable of lethal use” into any:

  • Church or place where people have assembled for worship, or into any election precinct on any election day, or into any building owned or occupied by any agency of the federal government, state government, or political subdivision thereof;3 or
  • School bus, or onto the premises of any function or activity sponsored or sanctioned by school officials or the district school board.4

These restrictions do not apply if the firearm is: 1) not readily accessible; 2) transported in a nonfunctioning state; or 3) unloaded, and ammunition for the firearm is not readily accessible.5

No person may possess a firearm in or about the premises of a correctional center, city or county jail, county correctional facility, or private prison or jail.6

Subject to certain conditions, counties and municipalities in Missouri may prohibit the carrying of concealed firearms, including by concealed carry endorsement holders, in any building or portion of a building owned, leased or controlled by the county or municipality.7 Criminal penalties may not be imposed for a violation, but the local laws may deny a violator entrance to the building, order a violator to leave the building and, if an employee of the unit of government, subject a violator to disciplinary measures.8

In addition, the general assembly, supreme court, county or municipality may, by rule, administrative regulation or ordinance, prohibit or limit the carrying of concealable firearms by endorsement holders in that portion of a building owned, leased or controlled by that unit of government (clearly identified by signs posted at the entrance to the restricted area).9 The statute, rule or ordinance must exempt any building used for public housing by private persons, highways or rest areas, firing ranges, and private dwellings owned, leased or controlled by that unit of government from any restriction on the carrying or possession of a firearm. The statute, rule or ordinance must not specify any criminal penalty for a violation but may specify that persons violating the statute, rule or ordinance may be denied entrance to the building, ordered to leave the building and, if employees of the unit of government, be subjected to disciplinary measures for violation of the provisions of the statute, rule or ordinance.10

For nearly all of the location restrictions listed above under Missouri Revised Statutes § 571.107.1, possession of a firearm in a vehicle on the premises of the specific location is not a criminal offense so long as the firearm is not removed from the vehicle or brandished while the vehicle is on the premises.11

Notes
  1. See 2016 Mo. S.B. 656, vetoed by the Governor on June 27, 2016, veto overriden on September 14, 2016. For more information, see our page on Concealed Weapons Permitting in Missouri. ⤴︎
  2. Mo. Rev. Stat. § 571.107.1; see also 2016 Mo. S.B. 656, amending § 571.030.1(1). ⤴︎
  3. Mo. Rev. Stat. § 571.030.1(8). ⤴︎
  4. Mo. Rev. Stat. § 571.030.1(10). ⤴︎
  5. Mo. Rev. Stat. §§ 571.030.3, 571.030.4. ⤴︎
  6. Mo. Rev. Stat. §§ 217.360.1, 221.111.1(4). ⤴︎
  7. Mo. Rev. Stat. § 571.107.1(6). ⤴︎
  8. Id. ⤴︎
  9. Mo. Rev. Stat. § 571.107.1(6). ⤴︎
  10. Id. ⤴︎
  11. Mo. Rev. Stat. § 571.107.1. For penalties for violation of these location restrictions, see Mo. Rev. Stat. § 571.107.2. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Montana

Montana prohibits any person, whether or not he or she possesses a permit to carry a concealed weapon, from carrying concealed in:

  • Portions of a building used for state or local government offices and related areas in the building that have been restricted;
  • A room in which alcoholic beverages are sold, dispensed, and consumed under a license for the sale of alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises;
  • A bank, credit union, savings and loan institution, or similar institution during the institution’s normal business hours, except:
    • While using an institution’s drive-up window, automatic teller machine, or unstaffed night depository; or
    • At or near a branch office of an institution in a mall, grocery store, or other place unless the person is inside the enclosure used for the institution’s financial services or is using the institution’s financial services.1

Montana also generally prohibits any person from carrying a firearm, whether openly or concealed, on a state game preserve, although the Director of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks may issue a permit to carry firearms in these areas.2

A landlord or operator of a hotel or motel may not, by contract or otherwise, prevent a tenant or a guest of a tenant from possessing on the premises a firearm that it is legal for the tenant or guest to possess.3

Montana has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Mont. Code Ann. § 45-8-328. ⤴︎
  2. Mont. Code Ann. § 87-5-401. ⤴︎
  3. Mont. Code Ann. § 70-24-110. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Nebraska

A holder of a concealed handgun permit may carry a concealed handgun anywhere in Nebraska except:

  • A police, sheriff, or Nebraska State Patrol station or office;
  • A detention facility, prison, or jail;
  • A courtroom or building which contains a courtroom;
  • A polling place during a bona fide election;
  • A meeting of the governing body of a county, public school district, municipality, or other political subdivision;
  • A meeting of the Legislature or a committee of the Legislature;
  • A financial institution (except that a financial institution may authorize its security personnel to carry concealed handguns on duty1);
  • A professional, semiprofessional, or collegiate athletic event;
  • A place of worship (except that a place of worship may authorize its security personnel to carry concealed handguns, assuming notice is provided to the congregation2);
  • A hospital, emergency room or trauma center;
  • A political rally or fundraiser;
  • An establishment having a license issued under the Nebraska Liquor Control Act that derives over one-half of its total income from the sale of alcoholic liquor;
  • A place where the possession or carrying of a firearm is prohibited by state or federal law;
  • A place or premises where the person(s), entity, entities or employer in control has prohibited permit holders from carrying concealed handguns; or
  • Any other place or premises where handguns are prohibited by state law.3

A permit holder may carry a concealed handgun in his or her vehicle or on his or her person while riding in or on a vehicle into any parking area open to the public that is used by any of the aforementioned locations, if prior to exiting the vehicle the handgun is locked inside the glove box, trunk, or other compartment of the vehicle, a storage box securely attached to the vehicle, or, if the vehicle is a motorcycle, a hardened compartment securely attached to the vehicle.4

If a person(s), entity, entities or employer in control of property prohibits a permit holder from carrying concealed weapons in or onto property or premises open to the public, a permit holder is not prohibited from possessing a concealed handgun under such circumstances unless the person(s), entity, entities or employer in control of the property has posted conspicuous notice or has made a request that the permit holder remove the concealed handgun from the place or premises.5

Nebraska generally prohibits the carrying of a firearm within the boundaries of a state game refuge6 or the State Wild Game Preserve.7

Nebraska has no law prohibiting firearms in:

  • Parks;
  • Certain bars or restaurants where alcohol is served; or
  • Gambling facilities.
Notes
  1. Neb. Rev. Stat. § 69-2441(1)(b). ⤴︎
  2. Neb. Rev. Stat. § 69-2441(1)(c). ⤴︎
  3. Neb. Rev. Stat. § 69-2441(1)(a). ⤴︎
  4. Neb. Rev. Stat. § 69-2441(3). ⤴︎
  5. Neb. Rev. Stat. § 69-2441(2). ⤴︎
  6. Neb. Rev. Stat. § 37-708. ⤴︎
  7. Neb. Rev. Stat. § 37-712. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Nevada

Nevada provides that a concealed firearm permittee may carry a concealed firearm while he or she is on the premises of any public building other than:

  • A public airport;
  • A public school, child care facility, or property of the Nevada System of Higher Education (unless the permittee has obtained written permission to carry a concealed firearm while on the premises); or
  • A public building that has a metal detector at each public entrance or a sign posted at each public entrance indicating that no firearms are allowed in the building (with limited exceptions for judges, prosecuting attorneys, employees working in that public building, or those with the written permission of a person in control of the public building).1

Nevada generally prohibits any person from interfering in the legislative process by willfully possessing any firearm in the state legislative building or any other place where the legislature conducts its business.2

Other locations where a permittee is not allowed to carry a concealed firearm, include:

  1. Any facility of a law enforcement agency;
  2. A prison, county or city jail or detention facility;
  3. A courthouse or courtroom;
  4. Any other building owned or occupied by the Federal Government, Nevada or a local government; or
  5. Any other place in which the carrying of a concealed firearm is prohibited by state or federal law.3

Nevada has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks (The Administrator of the Division of State Parks, however, is prohibited from establishing restrictions on the possession of firearms within state parks or recreational facilities which are more restrictive than state law.4
  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Nev. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 202.3673(1)-(4). ⤴︎
  2. Nev. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 218A.905(8). ⤴︎
  3. Nev. Admin. Code § 202.020. ⤴︎
  4. Nev. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 407.0475(2)(c). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in New Hampshire

New Hampshire prohibits any person, even the holder of a license to carry a loaded handgun, from carrying any firearm into a courtroom or area used by a court.1

New Hampshire has no laws prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Bars and other places where alcoholic beverages are sold or served;
  • Places of worship;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 159:19. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in New Jersey

New Jersey does not explicitly limit locations where a person may carry a firearm. The state generally prohibits the open carrying of firearms without a permit to carry a handgun or Firearm Purchaser Identification Card. Individuals may not carry a handgun concealed without a permit.

Notwithstanding these state restrictions, New Jersey allows any person to keep or carry a firearm in his or her place of business, residence, or other land owned or possessed by him or her.1 The state also permits carrying a firearm to or from these locations or to or from a place of purchase or repair.2

New Jersey has no statutes prohibiting the possession of firearms with a proper permit in the following locations, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2C:39-6e. ⤴︎
  2. Id. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in New Mexico

New Mexico prohibits the carrying of firearms in the following locations:

  • In an establishment licensed to dispense alcoholic beverages1 unless, among other exceptions:
  • The possessor has a valid concealed handgun license; and
  • The establishment: a) does not serve alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises; or b) is a restaurant licensed to sell only beer and wine that derives not less than 60% of its annual gross receipts from the sale of food for consumption on the premises, unless the restaurant has posted conspicuous signs prohibiting gun possession or verbally instructs the possessor that the carrying of guns is prohibited;2
  • Within or upon any game refuge, unless the person is crossing the refuge over a public road or trail with the firearm unloaded, or the director of the refuge granted the possessor a permit;3
  • In the confines of a county or municipal jail;4
  • On the grounds of a designated adult correctional institution;5
  • On the grounds of a designated child detention or correctional facility;6 and
  • For any loaded firearm, whether concealed or unconcealed, within a state park, except during designated hunting seasons or in certain authorized areas.7

Concealed handgun license holders are subject to these generally applicable possession prohibitions.8 A licensee may not carry a concealed handgun on private property where signs are posted prohibiting the carrying of concealed weapons, or when verbally told of the prohibition by a person lawfully in possession of the property.9

A concealed handgun license also is not valid in a courthouse or court facility unless authorized by the presiding judicial officer10 or on tribal land unless authorized by the governing body of an Indian nation, tribe or pueblo.11

Local court rules may prohibit firearms in courthouses or judicial complexes.12

New Mexico has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. N.M. Stat. Ann. § 30-7-3(A). ⤴︎
  2. N.M. Stat. Ann. § 30-7-3(A)(4). ⤴︎
  3. N.M. Stat. Ann. § 17-2-12. ⤴︎
  4. N.M. Stat. Ann. § 30-22-14(B). ⤴︎
  5. N.M. Stat. Ann. § 30-22-14(A). ⤴︎
  6. N.M. Stat. Ann. § 30-22-14.1(A), (B)(1). ⤴︎
  7. N.M. Code R. § 19.5.2.20(A). ⤴︎
  8. N.M. Stat. Ann. § 29-19-8(A) provides that nothing in the Concealed Handgun Carry Act, N.M. Stat. Ann. §§ 29-19-1 – 29-19-14, shall be construed as allowing a licensee to carry a concealed handgun into or on premises where to do so would be in violation of state or federal law. ⤴︎
  9. N.M. Code R. §§ 10.8.2.16(F); 10.8.2.27. ⤴︎
  10. N.M. Stat. Ann. § 29-19-11. ⤴︎
  11. N.M. Stat. Ann. § 29-19-10. ⤴︎
  12. See, e.g., 13th Jud. Dist. R. 210. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in New York

A New York license to carry a handgun is generally not valid in New York City without an additional permit issued by local law enforcement.1

Firearm possession is generally prohibited:

• In state parks, except for hunting purposes where permitted;2

• On the grounds of a residential child care facility;3

• At any facility of the New York Department of Mental Hygiene, or any residential facility that has an operating certificate issued by the Department;4 or

• At any facility operated or licensed by the Office of Mental Health of the Department of Mental Hygiene.5

New York has no laws prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

• Bars and other places where alcoholic beverages are sold or served;
• Places of worship;
• Sports arenas;
• Gambling facilities; or
• Polling places.

Notes
  1. N.Y. Penal Law § 400.00(7). ⤴︎
  2. N.Y. Comp. Codes R. & Regs. tit. .9, § 375.1(p). ⤴︎
  3. N.Y. Comp. Codes R. & Regs. tit. 18, § 441.19(f). ⤴︎
  4. N.Y. Comp. Codes R. & Regs. tit. 14, § 45.1. ⤴︎
  5. N.Y. Comp. Codes R. & Regs. tit. 14, § 542.5(a). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in North Carolina

With exceptions for a small number of specified government employees and security guards, North Carolina generally prohibits any person, including concealed handgun permit holders, from carrying a firearm, whether openly or concealed, into the following locations:

  • Educational facilities (except that a concealed handgun permittee may keep a firearm locked in his or her vehicle on the grounds of these facilities);1
  • A law enforcement or correctional facility;
  • A state or federal building or office of the state or federal government (except that a concealed handgun permittee may keep a firearm locked in his or her vehicle on the grounds of these buildings);
  • Any private property where the legal possessor has posted conspicuous notice or stated that carrying a concealed handgun is prohibited; or
  • Any place where the carrying of a concealed firearm is prohibited under federal law.2

North Carolina also generally prohibits persons without a concealed handgun permit from carrying any firearms into the following locations:

  • Any parade, funeral procession, picket line, or demonstration upon any private health care facility or public place;3
  •  Any assembly where a fee has been charged for admission, or any establishment in which alcoholic beverages are sold and consumed, (except by the owner or lessee of the premises or establishment, or by a person participating in the event carrying a gun with the permission of the owner, lessee, or event sponsor);4

Pursuant to a law enacted in 2011, a concealed handgun permittee is authorized to carry a concealed handgun into a state park.5  However, the law allows a local government to adopt an ordinance prohibiting the carrying of a concealed handgun on a municipal and county playground, athletic field, swimming pool, or athletic facility, although a concealed handgun licensee may still secure a handgun within the trunk, glove box, or other enclosed compartment or area of a locked vehicle.6

In 2015, the state enacted a law allowing the Commissioner of Agriculture to prohibit firearms at the State Fair, however, concealed handgun permittees must be allowed to store their firearms in their locked vehicles on the State Fairgrounds.7

North Carolina has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Hospitals;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.

State administrative regulations may prohibit the carrying of firearms in additional locations.

 

Notes
  1. N.C. Gen. Stat. § 14-269.2(k). North Carolina has defined “educational facilities” to include school buildings, school buses, school campuses, school grounds, school recreational areas, school athletic fields, or other property owned or operated by any board of education or school board of trustees, or directors for the administration of any school. N.C. Gen. Stat. § 14-269.2(a). ⤴︎
  2. N.C. Gen. Stat. §§ 14-415.11(c), 14-415.27. ⤴︎
  3. N.C. Gen. Stat. § 14-277.2. ⤴︎
  4. N.C. Gen. Stat. § 14-269.3. Note that N.C. Gen. Stat. § 14-415.11(c2) also makes it unlawful for any person, with or without a permit, to carry a concealed handgun while consuming alcohol, or at any time while the person has remaining in the person’s body any alcohol, or in the person’s blood a controlled substance previously consumed.  A person does not violate this condition if a controlled substance in the person’s blood was lawfully obtained and taken in therapeutically appropriate amounts or if the person is on the person’s own property. ⤴︎
  5. N.C. Gen. Stat. § 14-415.11(c1). ⤴︎
  6. N.C. Gen. Stat. § 14-415.23. ⤴︎
  7. N.C. Gen. Stat. § 106-503.2. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in North Dakota

With limited exceptions, any person, including a concealed carry licensee, may not knowingly possess a firearm at:

  • The part of a liquor establishment set aside for the retail sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages, unless the person is the proprietor, the proprietor’s employee, or a designee of the proprietor displaying an unloaded firearm as a prize or sale item in a raffle or auction;1
  • An establishment used as a gaming site at which bingo is the primary gaming activity, unless the person is the proprietor, the proprietor’s employee, or a designee of the proprietor displaying an unloaded firearm as a prize or sale item in a raffle or auction;2 or
  • A public gathering (defined to mean a sporting or athletic event, school, church, or publicly owned or operated building), however, a person with a concealed carry permit may carry in a church or other house of worship if authorized by the church’s authorities.3

However, the prohibition on possession of a firearm at public gatherings does not apply to:

  • Competitors participating in organized sport shooting events;
  • Gun and antique shows;
  • Participants using blank cartridge firearms at sporting or theatrical events;
  • Firearms carried in a temporary residence or motor vehicle;
  • Students and instructors at hunter safety classes;
  • An individual in a publicly owned or operated rest area or restroom; or
  • Private security personnel while on duty.4

Possession of a firearm within a state game refuge or state game management area is generally prohibited.5

Possession of a rifle or shotgun between sunset and sunrise in and about territory where big game animals are frequently and usually found is prima facie evidence that the person was hunting big game animals contrary to law.6

North Dakota law prohibits being “afield”7 with a firearm while intoxicated or under the influence of alcoholic beverages or drugs.8 However, the only penalty for a violation of this section is revocation of the person’s hunting privileges for two years.9

Notes
  1. N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-02-04. ⤴︎
  2. N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-02-04. ⤴︎
  3. N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-02-05. ⤴︎
  4. N.D. Cent. Code §62.1-02-05(2). ⤴︎
  5. N.D. Cent. Code § 20.1-11-13(3). The owner or lessee of lands or a lake set aside as a state game refuge may not carry firearms within its limits, nor permit his or her family members or other persons to do so, unless the owner or lessee has reason to believe there are carnivorous animals in the refuge and the Director of the North Dakota Game and Fish Department provides written permission to hunt such animals. N.D. Cent. Code § 20.1-11-08. ⤴︎
  6. N.D. Cent. Code § 20.1-05-05. ⤴︎
  7. “Afield” is defined in N.D. Cent. Code § 20.1-01-02 as “away from one’s home or camp.” ⤴︎
  8. N.D. Cent. Code § 20.1-01-06. ⤴︎
  9. N.D. Cent. Code §§ 20.1-01-06, 20.1-15-01—20.1-15-15. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Ohio

Regardless of whether or not he or she has been issued a concealed handgun license, no person may possess a firearm in the following locations:

• A law enforcement office or correctional institution;1

• An airport passenger terminal;2

• A facility operated by the Ohio Department of Mental Health;3

• Any room or open air arena in which beer or intoxicating liquor is being served on premises for which a liquor license has been issued4 (in 2011, Ohio passed SB 17 to exempt concealed weapons license holders from this restriction provided that the license holder is not consuming beer or liquor or under the influence of alcohol or a drug of abuse);

• A courthouse or building in which a courtroom is located (with limited exceptions);5

• A place of worship, unless the place of worship posts notice or otherwise permits concealed handguns;6

• A child day-care center or family day-care home, except that a licensee who resides in a family day-care home may carry a handgun in any part of the home not used for day-care purposes. He or she may carry a handgun in any part of the home that is used for day-care purposes at a time during which no children, other than the licensee’s own children, are in the home;7

• An aircraft that is in operation or intended for operation in foreign, interstate, or intrastate air transportation or mail transportation;8

• Any building that is a government facility of the state or political subdivision of the state and not used primarily as a shelter, restroom, parking facility for motor vehicles, or rest facility;9

• Any place in which federal law prohibits the carrying of a handgun;10

• Any privately-owned land or premises, or land or premises leased from Ohio or the United States or political subdivisions of Ohio or the United States, upon which the owner, lessee, or person in control posts a sign prohibiting persons from carrying firearms onto the land or premises.11

Ohio has no law prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

• Parks;

• Hospitals;

• Gambling facilities; or

• Polling places.

Notes
  1. Ohio Rev. Code § 2923.126(B)(1). ⤴︎
  2. Ohio Rev. Code § 2923.126(B)(1). ⤴︎
  3. Ohio Rev. Code § 2923.126(B)(1). ⤴︎
  4. Ohio Rev. Code §§ 2923.121(B)(1)(e), 2923.126(B)(4). ⤴︎
  5. Ohio Rev. Code §§ 2923.123; 2923.126(B)(3). ⤴︎
  6. Ohio Rev. Code § 2923.126(B)(6). ⤴︎
  7. Ohio Rev. Code § 2923.126(B)(7). ⤴︎
  8. Ohio Rev. Code § 2923.126(B)(8). ⤴︎
  9. Ohio Rev. Code § 2923.126(B)(9). ⤴︎
  10. Ohio Rev. Code § 2923.126(B)(10). ⤴︎
  11. Ohio Rev. Code § 2923.126(C)(3). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Oklahoma

Oklahoma prohibits any person from carrying or possessing a firearm in any establishment where low-point beer or alcoholic beverages are consumed, unless the person is the proprietor of the establishment, or the person possesses a valid handgun license and the sale of low-point beer or alcoholic beverages is not the primary purpose of the business.1

The state also generally prohibits any person from bringing a gun into or having a gun in his or her possession in any jail or state penal institution or other place where prisoners are located.2

The state allows any private landowner, the landowner’s designated employee, or a lessee to possess a chamber-loaded firearm on the landowner’s property, provided that no convicted felon carries it.3

People carrying concealed firearms, including valid handgun license holders, are prohibited from carrying a concealed or unconcealed handgun into:

  • Any structure, building, or office space owned or leased by a city, town, county, state, or federal governmental authority for the purpose of conducting business with the public;
  • Any prison, jail, detention facility or any facility used to process, hold, or house arrested persons, prisoners or persons alleged delinquent or adjudicated delinquent;
  • Any elementary or secondary school, except where a policy has been adopted by the governing entity of a private school that authorizes valid handgun license holders to carry and possess a weapon on private school property or in any school bus or vehicle used by a private school;4
  • Any sports arena during a professional sporting event;
  • Any place where pari-mutuel wagering is authorized by law; and
  • Any other place specifically prohibited by law.5

Open carry of handguns is also prohibited in municipal zoos or parks owned by public trust or nonprofit entities, though concealed carry is allowed.6

For purposes of each of the prohibited locations above, except elementary and secondary schools, technology center school property, and other places specifically prohibited by law, prohibited locations for handgun license holders do not include:

  • Any property set aside for the use of any vehicle, whether attended or unattended, by a city, town, county, state, or federal governmental authority;
  • Any property set aside for the use of any vehicle, whether attended or unattended, by any entity offering any professional sporting event which is open to the public for admission, or by any entity engaged in pari-mutuel wagering authorized by law;
  • Any property adjacent to a structure, building or office space in which concealed or unconcealed weapons are prohibited by license holders as noted above;
  • Any property designated by a city, town, county, or state governmental authority as a park, recreational area, wildlife refuge or wildlife management area or fairgrounds; provided this provision shall not be construed to authorize any entry by a person in possession of a concealed handgun into any structure, building or office space where concealed handguns are prohibited by license holders; and
  • Any property set aside by a public or private elementary or secondary school for the use or parking of any vehicle, whether attended or unattended; provided, however, said handgun must be stored and hidden from view in a locked motor vehicle when the motor vehicle is left unattended on school property.7

Oklahoma law precludes any person, property owner, tenant, employer, or business entity from establishing a policy or rule that would prohibit any person (except a convicted felon) from transporting and storing a firearm in a locked vehicle on any property set aside for a vehicle.8 Otherwise, Oklahoma does not limit, restrict or prohibit in any manner the existing rights of any person, property owner, tenant, employer, or business entity to control the possession of weapons on any property owned or controlled by the person or business entity.9

Oklahoma has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21, § 1272.1. Any person possessing a valid handgun license may carry the concealed handgun into any restaurant or other establishment licensed to sell low-point beer or alcoholic beverages, provided that the sale of such beverages does not constitute the primary purpose of the business. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21, §§ 1272.1, 1272.2. ⤴︎
  2. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 57, § 21. ⤴︎
  3. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 29, § 4-135(E). ⤴︎
  4. as provided by Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21 § 1277(C). ⤴︎
  5. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21 § 1277(A). ⤴︎
  6. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21 § 1277(E). ⤴︎
  7. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21 § 1277(B). ⤴︎
  8. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21, § 1290.22(B). ⤴︎
  9. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21, § 1290.22(A) and (C). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Oregon

Oregon law prohibits the intentional possession of a firearm while in or on a “public building.”1 This prohibition does not apply to persons licensed to carry a concealed handgun.2 “Public building” is defined to include:

  • A hospital;
  • Any “capitol building;”3
  • A public or private school, the grounds adjacent to each such building, and any site or premises being used exclusively for a student program or activity sponsored or sanctioned by the school;
  • A city hall or the residence of a state official elected by the state at-large;
  • The grounds adjacent to each of the aforementioned buildings; and
  • That portion of any other building occupied by an agency of the state or certain municipal corporations, other than a court facility.4

Any person who intentionally possesses a firearm in a court facility is criminally liable for a felony and must surrender that firearm to a law enforcement officer unless the presiding judge has entered an order permitting the possession of specified weapons in a court facility.5 This prohibition also does not apply to persons licensed to carry a concealed handgun.6

Any local correctional facility, lockup facility or temporary hold must prohibit firearms from the security area of the facility except in times of emergency as determined by the facility’s administrator.7

Oregon also prohibits the knowing possession of a firearm in a restricted access area of specified commercial airports.8

Oregon has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Places of worship;
  • Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Certain gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Or. Rev. Stat. § 166.370. ⤴︎
  2. Or. Rev. Stat. § 166.370(3)(d). ⤴︎
  3. Capitol building is defined in Or. Rev. Stat. § 166.360(1). ⤴︎
  4. Or. Rev. Stat. § 166.360(4). ⤴︎
  5. Or. Rev. Stat. § 166.370(2). ⤴︎
  6. Or. Rev. Stat. § 166.370(3)(d). ⤴︎
  7. Or. Rev. Stat. §§ 169.076(6); 169.077(3); 169.078(4). ⤴︎
  8. See Or. Rev. Stat. § 164.885(2). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania prohibits any person, even the holder of a license to carry a firearm, from knowingly possessing a firearm in a court facility or knowingly causing a firearm to be present in a court facility, with certain limited exceptions.1

Pennsylvania has no laws prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Bars and other places where alcoholic beverages are sold or served;
  • Places of worship;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. 18 Pa. Cons. Stat. Ann. § 913. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Rhode Island

Rhode Island has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks
  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.

Other Location Restrictions in South Carolina

No person, even a concealed weapons permit holder, may possess any firearm in or on:

  • The grounds of the South Carolina state capitol or within the capitol building (concealable weapons permit holders are exempt from bringing a handgun onto capitol grounds, but must leave their gun within a locked vehicle not readily accessible on the capitol grounds);1
  • Any publicly-owned building or property, without the express permission of the authorities in charge of the premises or property;2 or

Firearms are generally prohibited in a business which sells alcoholic liquor, beer or wine for consumption on the premises.  Concealed weapons permit holders, however, may carry firearms in these locations, unless the property owner, holder of the lease interest, or operator of the business has posted a ‘NO CONCEALABLE WEAPONS ALLOWED’ sign, or has requested that the person leave or remove the firearms from the premises.  Even permit holders may not consume alcoholic liquor, beer, or wine while carrying the concealable weapon on the business’ premises.3

Persons are prohibited from possessing a firearm at any park or facility under the jurisdiction of the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism (“Department”), except:

  • Anyone in an area specifically designated by the Department for the use of firearms;
  • A person carrying a concealable weapon pursuant to state permit; or
  • A licensed hunter with an unloaded firearm in a case or the trunk of a vehicle.4

An inmate of a state correctional facility or local detention facility is prohibited from carrying a firearm on his or her person or willfully concealing a firearm within any Department of Corrections facility or other place of confinement.5

An innkeeper may refuse or deny any accommodations, facilities, or privileges of a lodging establishment to a person whom the innkeeper reasonably believes is bringing in firearms,6 and may eject such a person from the lodging establishment.7

A permit to carry a concealable weapon does not authorize a permit holder to carry a concealable weapon into any:

  • law enforcement, correctional, or detention facility;
  • courthouse or courtroom;
  • polling place on election days;
  • office of or the business meeting of the governing body of a county, public school district, municipality, or special purpose district;
  • school or college athletic event not related to firearms;
  • daycare facility or preschool facility;
  • place where the carrying of firearms is prohibited by federal law;
  • church or other established religious sanctuary unless express permission is given the appropriate church official or governing body;
  •  hospital, medical clinic, doctor’s office, or any other facility where medical services or procedures are performed unless expressly authorized by the employer; or
  • place clearly marked with a sign prohibiting the carrying of a concealable weapon on the premises, except that a property owner or an agent acting on his behalf, by express written consent, may allow individuals of his choosing to enter onto property regardless of any posted sign to the contrary.8

Notwithstanding the aforementioned location restrictions, public and private employers retain the right to prohibit a person with a concealable weapons permit from carrying a concealable weapon upon the premises of the business or work place, or while using any machinery, vehicle, or equipment owned or operated by the business.9 Moreover, private property owners or persons in legal possession or control of private property have the right to allow or prohibit the carrying of a concealable weapon upon their premises.10 The posting of a sign stating “No Concealable Weapons Allowed” by the employer, owner, or person in legal possession or control of the property constitutes notice to a permit holder that the employer, owner, or person in legal possession or control requests that concealable weapons not be brought upon the premises or into the work place.11

Concealable weapons permit holders may not carry a concealable weapon into the residence or dwelling place of another person without the express permission of the owner or person in legal control or possession of the property.12

Permit holders are allowed to possess a firearm at an interstate highway rest area facility.13

Notes
  1. S.C. Code Ann. § 10-11-320. ⤴︎
  2. S.C. Code Ann. § 16-23-420(A). ⤴︎
  3. S.C. Code Ann. § 16-23-465. ⤴︎
  4. S.C. Code Ann. § 51-3-145(G). See also S.C. Code Ann. § 51-13-80(A)(7) (prohibiting the carrying of a firearm on the Riverbanks Park property). ⤴︎
  5. S.C. Code Ann. § 24-13-440. ⤴︎
  6. S.C. Code Ann. § 45-2-30(A)(1)(4). ⤴︎
  7. S.C. Code Ann. § 45-2-60(4). ⤴︎
  8. S.C. Code Ann. § 23-31-215(M). ⤴︎
  9. S.C. Code Ann. § 23-31-220(1). ⤴︎
  10. S.C. Code Ann. § 23-31-220(2). ⤴︎
  11. Id. Sign requirements for notice purposes are detailed under S.C. Code Ann. § 23-31-235. ⤴︎
  12. S.C. Code Ann. § 23-31-225. ⤴︎
  13. S.C. Code Ann. § 16-23-420(F). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in South Dakota

South Dakota prohibits carrying a concealed pistol in any licensed on-sale malt beverage or alcoholic beverage establishment that derives over one-half of its total income from the sale of malt or alcoholic beverages.1

In South Dakota, firearms may not be carried in county courthouses.2 Even concealed weapons permit holders are subject to this prohibition.

Firearms may not be carried in the state capitol in South Dakota, including in any building appended to or used as a supplementary structure to the state capitol.3 There is an exception to this prohibition for holders of an enhanced concealed carry permit who give advance notice to the superintendent of the Division of Highway Patrol.4 Enhanced permit-holders who give the required notice may carry concealed pistols anywhere in the state capitol except the Supreme Court chamber or other access-controlled private office under the supervision of security personnel.5

South Dakota has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following locations, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.

Note that South Dakota law specifically prohibits any state agency from adopting or promulgating any rule that restricts the right or privilege to carry or possess a pistol in contravention to a license to carry a concealed weapon.6

Notes
  1. S.D. Codified Laws § 23-7-70. ⤴︎
  2. S.D. Codified Laws § 22-14-23. However, S.D. Codified Laws § 22-14-24 provides an exception for “[t]he lawful carrying of a firearm or other dangerous weapon in a county courthouse incident to a hunter safety or a gun safety course or for any other lawful purposes.” Notice of these provisions must be conspicuously posted at each public entrance to each county courthouse. S.D. Codified Laws § 22-14-26. Courts retain authority to punish and promulgate rules restricting or prohibiting the possession of weapons within courthouses. S.D. Codified Laws § 22-14-25. Pursuant to S.D. Codified Laws § 22-14-27, it is not a defense that a person who violates S.D. Codified Laws § 22-14-23 is a concealed weapon permit holder. A majority of the members-elect of the county commission in any county may waive the provisions of S.D. Codified Laws § 22-14-28. ⤴︎
  3. S.D. Codified Laws §§ 22-14-22, 22-14-23. ⤴︎
  4. S.D. Codified Laws § 22-14-24(5). The notice must be given orally or in writing at least twenty-four hours prior to entering the state capitol with a concealed pistol and must include the date on which or the range of dates during which the person intends to possess a concealed pistol in the state capitol. ⤴︎
  5. S.D. Codified Laws §§ 22-14-24(5). ⤴︎
  6. S.D. Codified Laws § 1-26-6.10. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Tennessee

Tennessee generally allows the possession of a firearm within the confines of a licensed establishment open to the public where liquor, wine, beer or other alcoholic beverages are served for on-premises consumption unless the possessor is consuming any such alcoholic beverages on the premises.1 Handgun carry permit holders violating this provision will have their permits suspended for three years.2

Tennessee prohibits any person from intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly carrying a firearm on or about the person while inside any building in which judicial proceedings are in progress.3

In addition, Tennessee generally prohibits any person from possessing a firearm in, on, or while traversing any refuge, public hunting area or wildlife management area frequented or inhabited by big game, except during specified or lawful open hunting seasons in these areas.4 Handgun carry permit holders are generally exempt from this possession restriction, regardless of whether such area is frequented or inhabited by big game.5

An individual, corporation, business entity or local, state or federal government entity is authorized to prohibit the possession of firearms by any person attending a meeting conducted by, or on property owned, operated, or managed by or under the control of such individual, corporation, business entity or government entity.6 Notice must be posted according to statutory requirements and it is an offense to possess a weapon in a building or on property that is properly posted according to Tennessee law.7 Handgun carry permit holders are subject to this prohibition,8 however, a property owner may make an exception for a handgun to be carried in a concealed manner by persons authorized to do so.9 An individual, corporation, business entity, or government entity that uses signs to provide notice of this prohibition has until January 1, 2019, to use signs that meet the requirements of Tennessee law.10 Tennessee law grants immunity from civil liability for property owners, businesses, or other entities with respect to any claim based on a failure to adopt a policy that prohibits weapons on the property by pursuant to the above-mentioned law.11

Tennessee law states that the decision not to post property in this manner, thereby allowing persons with handgun permits to carry a handgun on the property, does not constitute an occupational safety and health hazard within the jurisdiction of the Tennessee Occupational Safety and Health Act.12

Tennessee generally prohibits the possession or carrying, openly or concealed and with the intent to go armed, of any of a specified list of prohibited weapons (not including most handguns and long guns)13 in or on the grounds of any public park, playground, civic center or other building facility, area or property owned, used or operated by any municipal, county or state government for recreational purposes.14 However, persons with valid handgun permits are generally exempted from this restriction when carrying concealed handguns.15

Under Tennessee law, local governments are generally prohibited from preventing concealed carry permit holders from possessing handguns on property owned or administered by the local government unless the building provides metal detectors and security officers at each public entrance to the building.16 However, these public building requirements do not apply to specified buildings, including schools, colleges or universities, libraries, licensed mental health and substance abuse facilities, law enforcement agency buildings, and courtrooms.17

Tennessee has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places:

  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.

State administrative regulations may govern the possession of firearms in these or other locations.

 

Notes
  1. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1321(b)(1). ⤴︎
  2. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1321(c)(2). ⤴︎
  3. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1306(a). ⤴︎
  4. Tenn. Code Ann. § 70-4-117(a). ⤴︎
  5. Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 70-4-117(d), 70-5-101. ⤴︎
  6. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1359(a)(1). ⤴︎
  7. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1359. ⤴︎
  8. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1359(a)(2). ⤴︎
  9. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1359(a)(1)(B). ⤴︎
  10. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1359(b)(4). ⤴︎
  11. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1325. ⤴︎
  12. Tenn. Code Ann. § 50-3-201. ⤴︎
  13. See Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1302(a) (the prohibited weapons include machine guns, short-barreled rifles or shotguns, and any other implements “for infliction of serious bodily injury or death” which have no lawful purpose). ⤴︎
  14. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1311(a). ⤴︎
  15. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1311(b)(1)(H). This is subject to certain limitations, including the presence of school-related athletic events or activities. Id. ⤴︎
  16. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1359(g). ⤴︎
  17. Id. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Texas

General Prohibitions

Texas law prohibits any person, including a valid handgun license holder, from intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly possessing a firearm of any sort:

  • On the premises of a polling place on the day of an election or while early voting is in progress
  • On the premises of any government court or offices utilized by the court, unless pursuant to written regulations or written authorization of the court
  • On the premises of a racetrack
  • In or into the area of an airport terminal building to which access is controlled by the inspection of persons and property under federal law unless all firearms were checked as baggage in accordance with federal or state law or regulations before entering
  • Within 1,000 feet of premises the location of which is designated by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice as a place of execution on a day that a sentence of death is set to be imposed, if the person received proper notice that going within 1,000 feet of the premises with a weapon was prohibited or that possessing a weapon within 1,000 feet of the premises was prohibited, unless the actor possesses the firearm while in a vehicle being driven on a public road or while at the actor’s residence or place of employment.1

Any assisted living facility is required to post a “provider’s bill of rights” in a prominent place in the facility, stating that a provider of personal care services has the right to “maintain an environment free of weapons.”2

Texas prohibits the possession of a deadly weapon while in a correctional facility.3

Texas law prohibits the possession of firearms on certain state-owned lands.4

Texas law considers a person to be guilty of trespassing if the person enters or remains on another person’s property with a firearm after receiving notice that firearms are forbidden. Special rules apply to handgun license holders, as noted below.5

Prohibitions Specific to Handgun License Holders

Texas law specifically provides that a handgun license holder is prohibited from intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly carrying a handgun on or about his or her person, regardless of whether the handgun is concealed:

  • On the premises of a correctional facility
  • On the premises of a hospital or a nursing home, unless the license holder has written authorization of the hospital or nursing home administration, as appropriate, provided effective notice was given6

License holders are generally allowed to carry a handgun on their person, either concealed or in a shoulder or belt holster, unless effective notice is given:

  • In an amusement park
  • On the premises of a church, synagogue, or other established place of religious worship
  • At any meeting of a governmental entity7

Effective “notice” is given if the owner of the property or someone with apparent authority to act for the owner provides notice by:

  • Oral communication;
  • A card or other document on which is written the following language: “Pursuant to Section 30.06, Penal Code (trespass by holder of license to carry a handgun), a person licensed under Subchapter H, Chapter 411, Government Code (handgun license law), may not enter this property with a handgun”; or
  • A sign posted on the property that includes the above language in both English and Spanish, appearing in contrasting colors with block letters at least one inch in height; and displayed in a conspicuous manner clearly visible to the public.8

If a license holder carries a handgun on the property of another without effective consent and received “notice” (as defined above) that entry by a license holder on the property with a handgun was forbidden or that remaining on the property with a handgun was prohibited and the license holder failed to depart, the license holder is criminally liable.9

Texas law allows public or private employers to prohibit persons who are licensed to carry handguns from doing so on the premises of the business.10 However, in 2011, Texas enacted a law that prevents employers from prohibiting employees who are handgun license holders from transporting or storing firearms or ammunition in a locked, privately owned motor vehicle in a parking area the employer provides for employees.11

Liquor Licensees, Hospitals, and Nursing Homes

Valid handgun license holders are also specifically prohibited from intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly carrying a handgun on or about his or her person, regardless of whether the handgun is concealed, on the premises of a business that has a permit or license issued under certain chapters of the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Code, if the business derives 51 percent or more of its income from the sale or service of alcoholic beverages for on-premises consumption. A person is subject to prosecution under this prohibition only if he or she received notice that entry on the property by a license holder with a handgun was forbidden, or that remaining on the property with a handgun was forbidden and failed to depart. For purposes of this prohibition, a person receives notice if the owner of the property or someone with apparent authority to act for the owner provides “notice” as described above.12

In addition, Texas law requires these businesses, as well as licensed hospitals and nursing homes, to prominently display, in both English and Spanish, a sign stating that it is unlawful for a person licensed to carry a handgun to carry a handgun on the premises. The sign must appear in contrasting colors with block letters at least one inch in height and, for the establishments serving alcohol, must include on its face the number “51” printed in solid red at least five inches in height. The sign must also be displayed in a conspicuous manner clearly visible to the public.13

Businesses holding these liquor permits or licenses who do not derive 51% or more of their income from the sale of alcoholic beverages for on-premises consumption, or who hold other liquor permits or licenses, are also prohibited from knowingly allowing a person to possess a firearm in a building on the licensed premises, but handgun license holders are exempt.14 Texas law requires a sign to be displayed in a prominent place on the premises giving notice that it is unlawful to carry a weapon on the premises unless the person is licensed to carry the weapon and it is a properly concealed firearm.15 The sign must be at least 6 inches high and 14 inches wide, must appear in contrasting colors, and shall be displayed in a conspicuous manner clearly visible to the public.16

Notes
  1. Tex. Penal Code § 46.03(a), (f) and (g). ⤴︎
  2. Tex. Health & Safety Code § 247.065(b)(9). ⤴︎
  3. Tex. Penal Code § 38.11(d)(2). ⤴︎
  4. Tex. Parks & Wild. Code § 62.081 prohibits the possession of a firearm on or across the land of the Lower Colorado River Authority. Possession of a firearm is also prohibited in:

    • All the state-owned riverbeds in LaSalle County (Tex. Parks & Wild. Code § 82.712)
    • All the state-owned riverbeds in McMullen County (Tex. Parks & Wild. Code § 82.722)
    • The state-owned land area and water in the Aransas and Poesta rivers in Bee County (Tex. Parks & Wild. Code § 82.732)
    • The state-owned riverbeds of the Nueces, Frio, and Atascosa rivers in Live Oak County (Tex. Parks & Wild. Code § 82.762)

    No person may possess a rifle or pistol for shooting on or over the water of Murvaul Lake in Panola County. Tex. Parks & Wild. Code § 283.022. ⤴︎

  5. See Tex. Penal Code § 30.05(f). ⤴︎
  6. Tex. Penal Code § 46.035. ⤴︎
  7. Tex. Penal Code § 46.035. ⤴︎
  8. Tex. Penal Code § 30.06(b), (c)(3). ⤴︎
  9. Tex. Penal Code § 30.06. This prohibition does not apply if the license holder possesses a handgun on property that is owned or leased by a governmental entity, and possession on that government property is otherwise lawful. Tex. Penal Code § 30.06(e). ⤴︎
  10. Tex. Gov’t Code § 411.203; Tex. Labor Code § 52.062(b). ⤴︎
  11. Tex. Labor Code § 52.061. ⤴︎
  12. Tex. Penal Code § 30.06(a)-(c). See also Tex. Penal Code § 46.035(b)(1), (k). ⤴︎
  13. Tex. Gov’t Code § 411.204. ⤴︎
  14. Tex. Alco. Bev. Code §§ 11.61(e) and 61.71(f). ⤴︎
  15. Tex. Alco. Bev. Code §§ 11.041 and 61.11. ⤴︎
  16. Tex. Alco. Bev. Code §§ 11.041, 61.11. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in the District of Columbia

Persons with concealed carry licenses are prohibited from carrying a handgun in the following locations or under the following circumstances:

  • A building or office occupied by the District of Columbia, its agencies, or instrumentalities;
  • The building and grounds, including any adjacent parking lot, of an childcare facility, preschool, public or private elementary or secondary school; or a public or private college or university;
  • A hospital, or an office where medical or mental health services are the primary services provided;
  • A penal institution, secure juvenile residential facility, or halfway house;
  • A polling place while voting is occurring;
  • A public transportation vehicle, including the Metrorail transit system and its stations;
  • A licensed establishment where alcohol is served, or sold and consumed, on the premises;
  • A stadium or arena;
  • A gathering or special event open to the public if the organizer has provided notice prohibiting the carrying of handguns in advance of the gathering or special event and posted signage at the event;
  • The public memorials on the National Mall and along the Tidal Basin, and any area where firearms are prohibited under federal law or by a federal agency or entity, including U.S. Capitol buildings and grounds;
  • Specific areas around the White House;
  • The U.S. Naval Observatory, its grounds, and certain adjacent areas;
  • When a dignitary or high-ranking government official is moving under the protection of law enforcement under certain circumstances;
  • Within an area no more than 1,000 feet of a demonstration in a public place so long as notice is provided;
  • Any prohibited location or circumstance that the Chief determines by rule; provided, that for spontaneous circumstances, no criminal penalty shall apply unless the licensee has notice of the prohibition and has failed to comply; and
  • A church, synagogue, mosque, or other place of worship unless authorized by the institution.1

The District also prohibits a person from carrying or having readily accessible a firearm upon the U.S. Capitol Grounds or within any of the Capitol Buildings.2 “Capitol Buildings” are the U.S. Capitol, the Senate and House Office Buildings and garages, the Capitol Power Plant, all subways and enclosed passages connecting two or more of such structures, and the real property underlying and enclosed by any such structure.3

Furthermore, the District prohibits possession of any firearm or ammunition in low-rent public housing4 and allows private persons or entities owning property in the District to prohibit or restrict gun possession on their property.5

Notwithstanding any other District law, a person holding a valid registration certificate for a firearm may carry that firearm:

  • Within the registrant’s home;
  • While it is being used for lawful recreational purposes;
  • While it is kept at the registrant’s place of business; or
  • While it is being transported for a lawful purpose as expressly authorized by District or federal statute and in accordance with the requirements of that statute.6

 

Notes
  1. D.C. Code Ann. §  7-2509.07. ⤴︎
  2. D.C. Code Ann. § 10-503.16(a)(1)(A). ⤴︎
  3. D.C. Code Ann. § 10-503.26(1). ⤴︎
  4. D.C. Mun. Regs. tit. 14, § 6500.8(c)(2). ⤴︎
  5. D.C. Code Ann. § 22-4503.02(b). ⤴︎
  6. D.C. Code Ann. § 22-4504.01. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Utah

Excluding certain exceptions for concealed weapons permittees, Utah generally prohibits the carrying of a loaded firearm:

  • In or on a vehicle;
  • On any public street; or
  • In a posted prohibited area.1

Utah prohibits the possession of a firearm within a “secure area” of an airport.2 A “secure area” for purposes of this section is an area established by the airport authority where firearms are restricted.3 A “secure area” must be located beyond the airport’s main area, and must have a notice prominently displayed.4 This prohibition applies equally to holders of concealed weapons permits.5

Utah authorizes the establishment of “secure areas” in correctional, law enforcement, and mental health facilities.6 Utah prohibits the intentional or knowing transportation of a firearm or ammunition into or on any “secure area” of a facility.7 State law also bans the knowing possession of a firearm at a correctional facility or in any “secure area” of a mental health facility without the permission of the authority operating the facility.8 Utah prohibits the transportation of a firearm or ammunition into or on any part of a correctional facility or into a “secure area” of a mental health facility with intent to provide it to an offender.9 To be a “secure area” for purposes of these sections, the area must not be normally accessible to the public, must have a notice posted at the entrance, and must have an adjacent area available for storing weapons.10

Utah regards “secure areas” as equally applicable to concealed weapons permit holders.11

State law allows correctional, law enforcement, and mental health facilities to further prohibit or control firearms and ammunition.12

Utah prohibits the knowing and intentional transportation or possession of a firearm in a house of worship or private residence if the organization operating the house of worship or the person with lawful right of possession of the private residence has properly given notice that firearms are prohibited.13 This prohibition applies equally to concealed weapons permittees.14

Utah has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Hospitals;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities;
  • Polling places; or
  • Establishments that serve alcohol.
Notes
  1. Utah Code Ann. § 76-10-505(1). ⤴︎
  2. Utah Code Ann. § 76-10-529(2). ⤴︎
  3. Utah Code Ann. § 76-10-529(3). ⤴︎
  4. Utah Code Ann. § 76-10-529(4). ⤴︎
  5. Utah Code Ann. § 53-5-710. ⤴︎
  6. Utah Code Ann. § 76-8-311.1(2)(a). ⤴︎
  7. Utah Code Ann. § 76-8-311.1(6). ⤴︎
  8. Utah Code Ann. § 76-8-311.3(4)(d). ⤴︎
  9. Utah Code Ann. § 76-8-311.3(4)(a). ⤴︎
  10. Utah Code Ann. §§ 76-8-311.1(1)(e), (3), (4) and 76-8-311.3(2)(g). ⤴︎
  11. Utah Code Ann. § 76-10-523.5. ⤴︎
  12. Utah Code Ann. §§ 76-8-311.1(2) and 76-8-311.3(2). ⤴︎
  13. Utah Code Ann. § 76-10-530. ⤴︎
  14. Utah Code Ann. § 53-5-710. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Vermont

Vermont prohibits the possession of a firearm in a courthouse without specific authorization from the court.1

In addition, the state prohibits the carrying or possession of a firearm in a private preserve without written consent of the owner or person having the exclusive right to take fish or wild animals on such lands.2 Possession of a firearm in the Bomoseen state game refuge is also prohibited.3

Firearms are regulated in state buildings in Vermont. The Commissioner of Buildings and General Services may promulgate rules and regulations concerning firearms and access to, and conduct upon, the grounds of structures and buildings which fall within the Commissioner’s jurisdiction.4

Vermont has no laws specifically prohibiting firearms in:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Bars or restaurants where alcohol is served;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 13, § 4016(b). ⤴︎
  2. Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 10, § 5204. ⤴︎
  3. Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 10, § 5226(c). ⤴︎
  4. Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 29, § 152(a)(14). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Virginia

Virginia prohibits the carrying of certain kinds of loaded firearms on or about the person, openly or concealed, on any public street, road, alley, sidewalk, public right-of-way, or in any public park or any other place of whatever nature that is open to the public in certain cities.1 More specifically, the law applies to a loaded: (i) semi-automatic center-fire rifle or pistol that expels single or multiple projectiles by action of an explosion of a combustible material and is equipped at the time of the offense with a magazine that will hold more than 20 rounds of ammunition or designed by the manufacturer to accommodate a silencer or equipped with a folding stock; or (ii) shotgun with a magazine that will hold more than seven rounds of the longest ammunition for which it is chambered.2 The law only applies in the Cities of Alexandria, Chesapeake, Fairfax, Falls Church, Newport News, Norfolk, Richmond, or Virginia Beach or in the Counties of Arlington, Fairfax, Henrico, Loudoun, or Prince William.3 Concealed handgun permit holders and individuals actually engaged in lawful hunting or lawful recreational shooting activities at an established shooting range or shooting contest are among the exceptions.4

Virginia also prohibits the possession of firearms by anyone, even concealed handgun permit holders, in:

  • A place of worship while a meeting for religious purposes is being held, unless the person has a “good and sufficient reason.”5 (Note, however, that the Attorney General of Virginia has opined that carrying a weapon for personal protection constitutes a “good and sufficient reason” under this law. 2011 Va. AG LEXIS 23, *4);
  • Any courthouse; or6
  • Any “air carrier airport terminal.”7

In 2010, Virginia enacted a law that allows concealed handgun permit holders to carry firearms in any restaurant or club licensed to serve alcoholic beverages for on-premises consumption. Concealed handgun permit holders were previously prohibited from carrying concealed handguns in these locations. Under the new law, permit holders were only prohibited from consuming an alcoholic beverage while on the premises.8

Virginia law also states that a concealed handgun permit does not authorize the possession of a firearm on property or in places where such possession is prohibited by law or the owner of private property.9

A Virginia law explicitly allows certain counties and cities to regulate the possession and storage of firearms and ammunition in family day homes so long as such regulation remains no more extensive in scope than comparable state regulations applicable to family day homes.10

Virginia law prohibits a public housing rental agreement from prohibiting or restricting lawful possession of a firearm within individual dwelling units unless required by federal law or regulation.11

Virginia has no laws prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-287.4. ⤴︎
  2. Id. ⤴︎
  3. Id. ⤴︎
  4. Id. ⤴︎
  5. Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-283. ⤴︎
  6. Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-283.1. ⤴︎
  7. Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-287.01. ⤴︎
  8. Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-308.012. ⤴︎
  9. Va. Code Ann. § 18.2-308.01(c). ⤴︎
  10. Va. Code Ann. § 15.2-914. ⤴︎
  11. Va. Code Ann. § 55-225.22:1. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Washington

Subject to exceptions, Washington prohibits all persons, including concealed pistol license holders, from possessing a firearm in:

  • Any area of a building used in connection with court proceedings, including courtrooms, jury rooms, judge’s chambers, offices and areas used to conduct court business, waiting areas, and corridors adjacent to areas used in connection with court proceedings. The local judicial authority must designate and clearly mark all areas where weapons are prohibited, and shall post notices at each entrance to the building of the prohibition against weapons in the restricted areas;
  • Restricted access areas of a public mental health facility certified by the state Department of Social and Health Services for inpatient hospital care and state institutions for the care of the mentally ill, excluding those facilities solely for evaluation and treatment;
  • Any portion of an establishment classified by the state liquor control board as off-limits to persons under 21 years of age; or
  • Restricted access areas of a commercial service airport designated in the airport security plan approved by the federal Transportation Security Administration, including passenger screening checkpoints at or beyond the point at which a passenger initiates the screening process. Any restricted access area shall be clearly indicated by prominent signs indicating that firearms and other weapons are prohibited in the area.1

Concealed pistol license holders are generally prohibited from possessing a firearm in any restricted access areas of a jail, law enforcement facility, or any place used for the confinement of a person, unless the holder obtains from the facility’s administrator written permission to possess the firearm while on the premises, or checks the firearm upon entering the facility.2

Washington prohibits any person from knowingly possessing or having under his or her control a firearm in the buildings or adjacent grounds subject to the care, control, or supervision of a state correctional institution.3 This provision does not apply, however, to a concealed pistol license holder who, upon entering the correctional institution premises, proceeds directly to the administration building, and promptly checks his or her firearms.4

State law also prohibits bringing any firearm into any state institution for the care and treatment of mental illness or within the grounds thereof.5

Washington also prohibits the possession of a firearm on the site of an outdoor music festival.6

State administrative regulations prohibit all persons, including concealed pistol license holders, from possessing a firearm:

  • In all facilities owned, leased, or operated by the office of administrative hearings and in rooms where the office of administrative hearings is conducting an administrative hearing;7
  • In all facilities of the Washington State School for the Blind and the Washington State School for the Deaf;8 or
  • On the grounds of any horse racing association.9

In addition, administrative regulations prohibit persons other than concealed pistol licensees from carrying firearms on the state capitol grounds.10 State regulations may impose other location restrictions.

Washington has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Places of worship;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities other than horse racing associations; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Wash. Rev. Code Ann. § 9.41.300(1)(b)-(e). ⤴︎
  2. Wash. Rev. Code Ann. § 9.41.300(1)(a), (7). ⤴︎
  3. Wash. Rev. Code Ann. § 9.94.043. ⤴︎
  4. Id. ⤴︎
  5. Wash. Rev. Code Ann. § 72.23.300. ⤴︎
  6. Wash. Rev. Code Ann. § 70.108.150. ⤴︎
  7. Wash. Admin. Code 10-20-010(1), 10-20-030. ⤴︎
  8. Wash. Admin. Code 72-140-080(4), 148-140-080(4). ⤴︎
  9. Wash. Admin. Code 260-20-075. ⤴︎
  10. Wash. Admin. Code 200-200-470(1). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in West Virginia

West Virginia prohibits any person from possessing a firearm or any other deadly weapon on any site that houses a court of law or in the offices of a family law master.1 The state also generally prohibits bringing any weapon upon the state capitol complex except when firearms are kept in locked vehicles, out of normal view.2

Any owner, lessee or other person charged with the care, custody and control of real property may prohibit the carrying, openly or concealed, of any firearm or deadly weapon on property under his or her domain.3 Any firearms possessor who refuses to temporarily relinquish possession of his or her firearm on such premises or who refuses to leave such premises, after being requested to do so, is criminally liable for a misdemeanor.4

West Virginia has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Hospitals;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities;
  • Polling places; or
  • Establishments that serve alcohol.
Notes
  1. W. Va. Code § 61-7-11a(g)(1), (h)(1). ⤴︎
  2. W. Va. Code § 61-6-19(b). ⤴︎
  3. W. Va. Code § 61-7-14. ⤴︎
  4. Id. ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Wisconsin

Unless the firearm is unloaded and encased, Wisconsin prohibits the possession of a firearm: 1) State fish hatchery;1 or 2) in a wildlife refuge.2 Under the 2011 Wisconsin law allowing licensees to carry concealed weapons in public, neither of these prohibitions applies to individuals licensed to carry a concealed weapon.3

Wisconsin generally proscribes the possession of a firearm in any building owned or leased by the state or any political subdivision of the state.4 This prohibition also does not apply to individuals licensed to carry a concealed weapon.5

With certain exceptions, Wisconsin also bans handguns from taverns, hotels and restaurants.6 This prohibition does not apply to individuals licensed to carry a concealed weapon if the licensee is not consuming alcohol on the premises,7 or to possession of a handgun that is unloaded and encased in a vehicle in any parking lot area.8

The Wisconsin law allowing licensees to carry concealed weapons provides that a licensee may not knowingly carry a firearm in any of the following places:

  • A police station, sheriff’s office, state patrol station, or the office of a division of criminal investigation special agent of DOJ;
  • A prison, jail, house of correction, or secured correctional facility;
  • A mental health facility for sexually violent persons;
  • The Wisconsin Resource Center;
  • Any secured unit or secured portion of a mental health institute;
  • Any county, state, or federal courthouse;
  • Any municipal courtroom if court is in session; or
  • A place beyond a security checkpoint in an airport.9

However, licensees may carry firearms in a vehicle driven or parked in a parking facility located in one of these buildings.10

An employer may prohibit licensees that it employs from carrying a concealed weapon or a particular type of concealed weapon in the course of the licensees’ employment.11

The 2011 Wisconsin law prohibits anyone, including individuals licensed to carry concealed weapons, from carrying a firearm on residential or nonresidential private property if the owner or occupant has notified the actor not to enter or remain at the residence while carrying a firearm or with that type of firearm. Similarly, no person may carry a firearm:

  • At a special event, if the organizers of the special event have notified the actor not to;
  • In a building that is owned, occupied, or controlled by the state or any local governmental unit, if the state or local governmental unit has notified the actor not to; or
  • In any building on the grounds of a university or college, if the university or college has notified the actor not to.

These rules do not apply if the firearm is in a vehicle driven or parked in the parking facility.12 For purposes of these rules, the owner or occupant has provided notice if he or she has posted a sign that is located in a prominent place near all of the entrances to the part of the building to which the restriction applies or near all probable access points to the grounds to which the restriction applies, and any individual entering the building or the grounds can be reasonably expected to see the sign.13

Unless the property owner has posted the appropriate sign, Wisconsin has no laws prohibiting firearms in:

  • Hospitals;
  • Places of worship;
  • Sports arenas;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Wis. Stat. § 29.089(2). ⤴︎
  2. Wis. Stat. §§ 29.091(2), 29.621(4). ⤴︎
  3. Wis. Stat. §§ 29.089(2)(d), 29.091(2), 29.621(4)(d). ⤴︎
  4. Wis. Stat. § 941.235(1). ⤴︎
  5. Wis. Stat. §§ 941.235(2)(e). ⤴︎
  6. Wis. Stat. § 941.237(2). ⤴︎
  7. Wis. Stat. §§ 941.237(3)(cx). ⤴︎
  8. Wis. Stat. § 941.237(3)(e). ⤴︎
  9. Wis. Stat. § 175.60(16). ⤴︎
  10. Wis. Stat. § 175.60(16). ⤴︎
  11. Wis. Stat. § 175.60(15m)(a). ⤴︎
  12. Wis. Stat. § 943.13 (1m)(c). ⤴︎
  13. Wis. Stat. § 943.13(2)(bm)(2). The 2011 Wisconsin law also provides that a person who does not prohibit the carrying of concealed weapons on property that the person owns or occupies is immune from any liability arising from its decision. Wis. Stat. § 175.60(21)(b). ⤴︎

Other Location Restrictions in Wyoming

Except as authorized by a person in charge, a person commits a felony if that person takes or passes a deadly weapon into:

  • A jail;
  • A state penal institution;
  • The Wyoming boys’ school;
  • The Wyoming girls’ school;
  • A correctional facility operated by a private entity; or
  • The state hospital.1

Wyoming law prohibits an individual who is authorized to carry a concealed firearm from carrying a concealed firearm into any:

  • Facility used primarily for law enforcement operations or administration without the written consent of the chief administrator;
  • Detention facility, prison or jail;
  • Courtroom, except that nothing shall preclude a judge from carrying a concealed weapon or determining who will carry a concealed weapon in the courtroom;
  • Meeting of a governmental entity;
  • Meeting of the legislature or a legislative committee;
  • School, college or professional athletic event not related to firearms;
  • Portion of an establishment licensed to dispense alcoholic liquor and malt beverages for consumption on the premises, which portion of the establishment is primarily devoted to that purpose;
  • Elementary or secondary school facility;
  • College or university facility without the written consent of the security service of the college or university; or
  • Location where the carrying of firearms is prohibited by federal or state law.2

Wyoming has no statutes prohibiting firearms in the following places, although administrative regulations may apply:

  • Parks;
  • Hospitals;
  • Gambling facilities; or
  • Polling places.
Notes
  1. Wyo. Stat. § 6-5-209. ⤴︎
  2. Wyo. Stat. § 6-8-104(t). ⤴︎