Ammunition Regulation in Tennessee

Tennessee does not:

  • Require a license for the sale of ammunition;
  • Require sellers of ammunition to maintain a record of purchasers;
  • Require persons purchasing or possessing ammunition to obtain a license; or
  • Require the safe storage of ammunition in the home.

Regulation of Unreasonably Dangerous Ammunition

Tennessee prohibits the sale, offer for sale, display for sale, manufacture and use of any ammunition cartridge containing a bullet with explosive material designed to detonate upon impact.1 Federal prohibitions on certain kinds of armor-piercing ammunition also apply.

Persons Prohibited from Purchasing/Possessing Ammunition

Tennessee prohibits any person from intentionally, knowingly or recklessly selling ammunition to an intoxicated person.2 Tennessee does not otherwise prohibit the transfer of ammunition to, or the purchase and possession of ammunition by, persons who are ineligible to possess firearms under state law, although federal ammunition purchaser prohibitions apply.

See our Ammunition Regulation policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1304(b). Tennessee also prohibits the possession, use or attempted use of “restricted firearm ammunition” in the commission or attempted commission of a crime of violence. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1304(a), (b). “Restricted firearm ammunition” is any cartridge containing a bullet coated with a plastic substance other than a lead or lead alloy core, or a jacketed bullet with other than a lead or lead alloy core, or a cartridge of which the bullet itself is wholly composed of a metal or metal alloy other than lead. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1301(13). This definition does not include shotgun shells or solid plastic bullets. ⤴︎
  2. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1303(a)(2). ⤴︎

Background Checks in Tennessee

Federal law requires federally licensed firearm dealers (but not private sellers) to initiate a background check on the purchaser prior to sale of a firearm. Federal law provides states with the option of serving as a state “point of contact” and conducting their own background checks using state, as well as federal, records and databases, or having the checks performed by the FBI using only the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (“NICS”) database. (Note that state files are not always included in the federal database.)

Tennessee is a point of contact state for firearm purchaser background checks. In Tennessee, firearms dealers must initiate the background check required by federal law by contacting the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (“TBI”). TBI enforces the federal purchaser prohibitions referenced above.1

Any person appropriately licensed by the federal government may stock and sell firearms to any potential purchaser not ineligible to receive firearms because such recipient has been convicted of stalking,2 is addicted to alcohol, is prohibited under the prohibited categories of federal law3 or has been judicially committed to a mental institution or adjudicated as a mental defective.4

Before delivering any firearm to a purchaser, a firearms dealer must:

  • Receive from the prospective purchaser current identification;5
  • Complete a firearm transaction record as required by federal law and obtain the signature of the purchaser on the record;
  • Request that TBI conduct a criminal history record check on the purchaser, providing the following information to TBI:
    • The federal firearms license number of the dealer;
    • The business name of the dealer;
    • The place of transfer;
    • The name of the person making the transfer;
    • The make, model, caliber and manufacturer’s number of the firearm being transferred;
    • The name, gender, race, and date of birth of the purchaser;
    • The social security number of the purchaser, if one has been assigned; and
    • The type, issuer and identification number of the identification presented by the purchaser; and
  • Receive a unique approval number for the transfer from TBI and record this number on the firearm transaction record.6

TBI may require that the dealer verify the identification of the purchaser if that identity is in question by sending thumbprints of the purchaser to TBI.7

Firearm transfers will be denied if TBI finds that the potential purchaser has been charged with a crime for which a conviction would cause that purchaser to be prohibited under state or federal law from purchasing, receiving, or possessing a firearm, and a final disposition of the case has not occurred or is not recorded.8 However, if TBI has received written notice, signed and verified by the clerk of the court or the clerk’s designee, that indicates that no final disposition information is available, TBI must immediately reverse a denial and allow the sale to proceed.9 Alternatively, if the purchaser challenges a denial, TBI must proceed with efforts to obtain the final disposition information, and the purchaser may assist. If neither the purchaser nor TBI is able to obtain the final disposition information within 15 days, TBI must immediately notify the dealer that the transaction that was initially denied is now a “conditional proceed.” A “conditional proceed” means that the dealer may lawfully transfer the firearm to the purchaser.10

Tennessee law also requires the instant check unit of TBI to contact the relevant agency within one day if a person that is subject to a protective order entered into the Tennessee crime information center attempts to purchase a firearm.11

Under Tennessee law, if a person who has been adjudicated as a “mental defective” or judicially committed to a mental institution attempts to purchase a firearm, and the instant check unit of the Tennessee bureau of investigation confirms the person’s record, the unit shall contact, within twenty-four hours, the chief law enforcement officer of the jurisdiction where the attempted purchase occurred for the purpose of initiating an investigation into a possible violation of law.12

See our Background Checks policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Sellers of firearms who are not federally licensed dealers are not required to conduct background checks on purchasers in Tennessee.  See our Private Sales policy summary.

Notes
  1. Federal Bureau of Investigation, National Instant Criminal Background Check System Participation Map, at https://www.fbi.gov/file-repository/nics-participation-map.pdf/view. See Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 38-6-109 and 39-17-1316 for greater detail on TBI’s processing of criminal background checks. ⤴︎
  2. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-315. ⤴︎
  3. See 18 U.S.C. § 922. ⤴︎
  4. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1316(a)(1). ⤴︎
  5. See Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1316(f). ⤴︎
  6. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1316(c). ⤴︎
  7. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1316(g). ⤴︎
  8. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1316(n). ⤴︎
  9. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1316(p). ⤴︎
  10. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1316(o). ⤴︎
  11. Tenn. Code Ann. § 38-6-109(e). ⤴︎
  12. Tenn. Code Ann. § 38-6-109(f). ⤴︎

Child Access Prevention in Tennessee

Tennessee prohibits a parent or guardian from intentionally, knowingly or recklessly providing a handgun to a juvenile1 or permitting a juvenile to possess a handgun, if such parent or guardian knows of a substantial risk that such juvenile will use the handgun to commit a felony.2

Tennessee also prohibits any person age 18 or older, including a parent or legal guardian, who knows that a minor or student is in illegal possession of a firearm in or upon the premises of a public or private school, in or on such school’s athletic stadium or other facility or building where school sponsored athletic events are conducted, or a public park, playground or civic center, from failing to prevent the possession or failing to report the possession to the appropriate school or law enforcement officials.3

Tennessee does not otherwise impose criminal liability on adults who allow children access to firearms.

See our Child Access Prevention policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. “Juvenile” is defined as any person under age 18. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1319(a)(2). ⤴︎
  2. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1320(b). ⤴︎
  3. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1312(a). ⤴︎

Concealed Weapons Permitting in Tennessee

See our  Concealed Weapons Permitting policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Tennessee prohibits the possession of a firearm in public “with the intent to go armed,”1 although handgun carry permit holders are exempt from this prohibition.2 People without a permit may also carry at the person’s place of residence, place of business, or premises.3 Tennessee law also authorizes individuals protected by a court protective order to carry without a permit for 21 days or while their application for a permit is pending.4

Tennessee is a “shall issue” state, meaning that the Tennessee Department of Safety (“TDS”) must issue a handgun carry permit if the applicant meets certain qualifications. TDS shall issue a handgun carry permit to any resident or “permanent lawful resident” of Tennessee who is at least 21 years of age and is not prohibited from purchasing or possessing a firearm under federal or state law.5 Handgun carry permits will not be issued to any person who:6

  • Has been convicted of a criminal offense or is currently under indictment or information for any criminal offense that is designated as a felony, or that is a disqualifying misdemeanor for driving under the influence,7 stalking,8 or domestic violence,9 except for any federal or state offenses pertaining to antitrust violations, unfair trade practices, restraints of trade or other similar offenses relating to the regulations of business practices;
  • Is currently subject to any order of protection;
  • Is a fugitive from justice;
  • Is an unlawful user of or addicted to alcohol or any controlled substance and has been a patient in a rehabilitation program or hospitalized for alcohol or controlled substance abuse or addiction pursuant to a court order within ten years from the date of application ; or has been a voluntary patient in a rehabilitation program or hospitalized for alcohol or controlled substance abuse or addiction within three years from the date of application.
  • Has been convicted of driving under the influence of an intoxicant in this or any other state two or more times within ten years from the date of application and the convictions occurred within five years from the date of application or renewal;
  • Has been adjudicated as a mental defective;
  • Has been committed to or hospitalized in a mental institution;
  • Has had a court-appointed conservator by reason of a mental defect;
  • Has been judicially determined to be disabled by reason of mental illness, developmental disability or other mental incapacity;
  • Has, within seven years from the date of application, been found by a court to pose an immediate substantial likelihood of serious harm because of mental illness;
  • Is an alien and is illegally in the United States;
  • Has been discharged from the armed forces under dishonorable conditions;
  • Has renounced his or her United States citizenship;
  • Has been convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence as defined in federal law;
  • Is receiving social security disability benefits by reason of alcohol dependence, drug dependence or mental disability; or
  • Has been convicted of stalking.10

Firearm Safety Training

TDS requires applicants to submit proof of successful completion of a TDS-approved handgun safety course as a prerequisite to obtaining a handgun carry permit.11 The qualifying course must include both classroom hours and firing range instruction.12 A component of the classroom portion of all department-approved handgun safety courses must be instruction on alcohol and drugs, the effects of those substances on a person’s reflexes, judgment and ability to safely handle a firearm, and the Tennessee prohibition against possession of a handgun while under the influence.13 An applicant is not required to comply with the classroom hours and firing range provisions, however, if he or she submits proof to TDS that within five years from the application filing date, the applicant has:

  • Been certified by the peace officer standards and training commission;
  • Successfully completed training at the law enforcement training academy; or
  • Successfully completed the firearm training course required for armed security guards or officer registration.14

An applicant that, at any time prior to submitting an application, completed all handgun training of at least four hours, as required by any branch of the military, is not required to comply with these training requirements either.15 Permit holders are not required to complete a handgun safety course to maintain or renew a handgun carry permit, or to complete any additional handgun safety course after obtaining a permit.16 In addition, no permit holder is required to complete any additional handgun safety course if he or she applies for a permit renewal within within eight years of the date of expiration.17

Duration & Renewal

Handgun carry permits require an application fee of $100, and are generally valid for eight years.18 Permit holders may renew a permit by submitting a renewal application and a fee of $50.19 The Department of Public Safety must conduct a name-based criminal history record check on a permit holder every four years.20 Tennessee law also authorizes applicants who would otherwise meet the handgun carry permit qualification standards above to receive a lifetime handgun carry permit if they submit a one-time fee of $200.21 Every five years after issuance of the lifetime handgun carry permit, the Department of Public Safety must conduct a criminal history record check in the same manner as required for handgun carry permit renewals.22 A lifetime handgun carry permit will continue to be valid for the life of the permit holder unless the record check determines that the permit holder no longer meets the legal requirements.23 Upon discovery that a lifetime handgun carry permit holder no longer satisfies the requirements, the Department shall suspend or revoke the permit.24

Disclosure or Use of Information

TDS is required to make available to the public a statistical report that includes the number of permits issued, denied, revoked or suspended by TDS during the preceding month, listed by age, gender and zip code of the applicant or permit holder, and the reason for any permit revocation or suspension.25 The report must include the cost of the program, the revenues derived from fees, the number of violations of the provisions of the handgun carry permit law, and the average time for issuance of a handgun carry permit.26 By January 1 of each year, a copy of such statistical reports for the preceding calendar year shall be provided to each member of the Tennessee General Assembly.27

TDS is also required to maintain statistics related to responses by law enforcement agencies to incidents in which a person who has a handgun carry permit is arrested for any offense.28

Reciprocity

Any handgun permit, firearm permit, weapons permit or license issued by another state is valid in Tennessee according to its terms and shall be treated as if it is a handgun permit issued by Tennessee.29 This provision shall not be construed, however, to authorize the holder of any out-of-state permit or license to carry any firearm or weapon other than a handgun.30

The Tennessee Commissioner of Safety shall enter into written reciprocity agreements regarding the carrying of concealed firearms with other states that require the execution of such agreements.31 If another state imposes conditions on Tennessee permit holders in a reciprocity agreement, such conditions shall also become a part of the agreement and apply to the other state’s permit holders when they carry a handgun in Tennessee.32

Restoration of Rights

Effective January 1, 2019, prohibited individuals who have had their rights to firearm possession restored under state or federal law will be able to apply for handgun carry permits. This does not apply to any person who has been convicted of a felony crime of violence, an attempt to commit a felony crime of violence, a felony drug offense, or a felony offense involving use of a deadly weapon.33

 

Notes
  1. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1307(a)(1). ⤴︎
  2. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1308(a)(2). ⤴︎
  3. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1308(a)(3). ⤴︎
  4. Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 36-3-626, 39-17-1308(a). ⤴︎
  5. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(b). An applicant over the age of 18 may apply for a permit if he or she is either: 1) an active member of the US armed forces who has completed a basic training program; or 2) an honorably discharged veterans over the age of 18 who has completed a basic training program. The applicant must provide adequate documentation of this status. Id. ⤴︎
  6. These listed prohibitions can be found under Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(c)(6) –(18). ⤴︎
  7. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(c)(11). ⤴︎
  8. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(c)(18). ⤴︎
  9. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(c)(16). ⤴︎
  10. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(p)(1). Additional application and background check requirements and other permit-related information are detailed throughout Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351. Permit suspension and revocation provisions are set forth at Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 39-17-1352, 39-17-1353 and 39-17-1354. ⤴︎
  11. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(e). Applicants must submit proof of the successful completion of a department-approved handgun safety course within one year of the date of application. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(e). ⤴︎
  12. Id. ⤴︎
  13. Id. ⤴︎
  14. Id. ⤴︎
  15. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(e)(4). ⤴︎
  16. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(m). ⤴︎
  17. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(m). ⤴︎
  18. Tenn. Code Ann. §§ 39-17-1351(n) and 39-17-1351(p). ⤴︎
  19. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(q)(1). A renewal application that is submitted within eight years of the permit expiration need only go through the normal renewal process. A renewal for a permit that has been expired for more than eight years will be treated as a new application. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(q)(2). ⤴︎
  20. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(n). ⤴︎
  21. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(x).  For retired law enforcement officers, the fee is generally $100. Id. ⤴︎
  22. Id. ⤴︎
  23. Id. ⤴︎
  24. Id. ⤴︎
  25. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(s)(1). ⤴︎
  26. Id. ⤴︎
  27. Id. ⤴︎
  28. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(s)(2)(A). ⤴︎
  29. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(r)(1). ⤴︎
  30. Id. ⤴︎
  31. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(r)(3)(A). ⤴︎
  32. Id. Additional provisions regarding the reciprocity of concealed weapons permit holders are detailed under Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(r). ⤴︎
  33. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1351(j). ⤴︎

Dealer Regulations in Tennessee

Federal law requires firearms dealers to obtain a license from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives (ATF), although resource limitations prevent the ATF from properly overseeing all its licensees.

Tennessee does not require firearms dealers to obtain a state license.

For laws:

A law enforcement agency may inspect the records of a dealer relating to transfers of firearms in the course of a reasonable inquiry during a criminal investigation or under the authority of a properly authorized subpoena or search warrant.1

See our Dealer Regulations policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1316(k). ⤴︎

Disarming Prohibited Persons in Tennessee

Tennessee law states that any weapon that is possessed, used or sold in violation of the law shall be confiscated by a law enforcement officer and declared to be contraband by a court of record exercising criminal jurisdiction.1

Domestic Violence Convictions

Persons convicted of domestic violence offenses are required to terminate possession of all firearms within 48 hours of the conviction by lawfully selling or transferring their firearms to a third party; such offenders must also file an affidavit with the court attesting that they relinquished all firearms, as required.2

Domestic Violence Orders of Protection

If a domestic violence order of protection is granted in a manner that fully complies with 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(8), the person subject to that order must lawfully terminate physical possession of all firearms he or she possesses, such as by transferring his or her firearms to a third party who is not prohibited from possessing firearms, within 48 hours of the granting of the order.3 Such respondents must also file an affidavit with the court attesting that they relinquished all firearms, as required, and is prohibited under state law from knowingly failing to surrender to law enforcement or lawfully transfer all firearms.4 Such individuals may re-assume possession of the dispossessed firearm at such time as the order expires or is otherwise no longer in effect.5

 

Notes
  1. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-13-1317. ⤴︎
  2. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-13-111. Specific procedures for relinquishment of firearms are detailed under Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-625. ⤴︎
  3. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-625. ⤴︎
  4. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-625(h)(1), (2). ⤴︎
  5. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-625(a)(2). ⤴︎

Domestic Violence & Firearms in Tennessee

Firearm Prohibitions for Domestic Violence Misdemeanants

Tennessee prohibits the carrying or possession of a firearm by any person convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence, as defined in federal law, and who is still “subject to the disabilities of such a conviction.”1 Federal law prohibits the purchase and possession of firearms and ammunition by persons who have been convicted in any court of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence.2

Persons convicted of a domestic violence offenses are required to terminate possession of all firearms within 48 hours of the conviction by lawfully selling or transferring their firearms to a third party; such offenders must also file an affidavit with the court attesting that they relinquished all firearms, as required.3

Firearm Prohibitions for Persons Subject to Domestic Violence Restraining/Protective Orders

Tennessee law prohibits the carrying or possession of a firearm while subject to an order of protection “that fully complies with 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(8)” (the federal law prohibiting firearm possession by an abuser subject to a protective order).4

The Tennessee law provides that persons obtaining a domestic violence order of protection may seek an order that prohibits a respondent from purchasing or possessing a firearm.5 The Tennessee Administrative Office of the Courts was required to revise the petition for an order of protection to fully advise the respondent that:

  • If the order of protection is granted in a manner that fully complies with 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(8), the respondent is required to terminate physical possession of all firearms possessed by respondent by any lawful means, such as transfer to a third party who is not prohibited from possessing firearms, within 48 hours of the granting of the order;
  • It is a criminal offense for a person subject to an order of protection that fully complies with 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(8) to possess a firearm while that order is in effect; and
  • The issuance of an order of protection may terminate, or at least suspend, the individual’s ability to purchase or possess a firearm.6

In Tennessee, an order of protection must state, on its face:

  • That the respondent is required to dispossess himself or herself, by any lawful means, of all firearms in his or her possession within 48 hours of the issuance of the order;
  • That the respondent is prohibited from possessing a firearm for so long as the order of protection or any successive order of protection is in effect, and may re-assume possession of the dispossessed firearm at such time as the order expires or is otherwise no longer in effect; and
  • Notice of the penalty for failing to comply with state laws regarding the possession of firearms when subject to an order of protection for domestic violence.7

The court must then order and instruct the respondent:

  • To terminate the respondent’s physical possession of the firearms in his or her possession by any lawful means, such as transferring possession to a third party who is not prohibited from possessing firearms, within 48 hours;
  • To complete and return the affidavit of firearm dispossession form the court may provide the respondent or direct the respondent to the administrative office of the courts’ web site; and
  • That if the respondent possesses firearms as business inventory or that are registered under the National Firearms Act,8 there are additional statutory provisions that may apply which the court must include in the content of its order.9

A temporary protective order must be issued by a court where, following an arrest for a crime involving domestic abuse, there is probable cause for the court to believe that the respondent used or displayed a “deadly weapon,” which includes a firearm.10

Tennessee prohibits any person subject to an order of protection that fully complies with 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(8) to knowingly fail to surrender or transfer all firearms the respondent possesses.11

Removal or Surrender of Firearms When Domestic Violence Protective Orders Are Issued

Tennessee law requires an individual subject to a domestic violence protection order to surrender all firearms by, for example, transferring them to a third party who may lawfully possess firearms; such respondents must also file an affidavit with the court attesting that they relinquished all firearms, as required.12

Removal or Surrender of Firearms at the Scene of a Domestic Violence Incident

In Tennessee, law enforcement officers that have probable cause to believe a criminal offense involving domestic abuse against a victim has occurred must seize all firearms that the alleged abuser may have used or threatened to use in the commission of a domestic abuse crime.13

During the arrest of an alleged abuser for a crime of domestic abuse against a victim, law enforcement officers may also seize any firearm in plain view of the officer or discovered pursuant to a consensual search if necessary for the protection of the officer or other persons.14

If multiple weapons are seized, a prosecuting court has authority to confiscate only the weapon or weapons actually used or threatened to be used by the abuser to commit the crime.15

See our Domestic Violence & Firearms policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1307(f)(1)(A). The crime of domestic violence, as applies to this section, is defined under federal law, 18 U.S.C. § 921(a)(33). Tennessee law also prohibits the sale of firearms to any person convicted of stalking under Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-315. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1316(a)(1). ⤴︎
  2. 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(9). ⤴︎
  3. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-13-111. Specific procedures for relinquishment of firearms are detailed under Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-625. ⤴︎
  4. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1307(f)(1)(B). ⤴︎
  5. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-604(b). ⤴︎
  6. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-604(c). ⤴︎
  7. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-625(a). See Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1307(f)(1)(B) for state prohibition on possessing a gun while subject to an order of protection. ⤴︎
  8. 26 U.S.C. §§ 5801 et seq. ⤴︎
  9. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-625(b). ⤴︎
  10. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-602(c); Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-11-106(a)(5). ⤴︎
  11. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-625(h)(1). ⤴︎
  12. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-625. Any such person who knowingly fails to do so is subject to a Class A misdemeanor. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-625(h)(2). ⤴︎
  13. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-620(a)(1). ⤴︎
  14. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-620(a)(2). A law enforcement officer is not required to remove a weapon such officer believes is needed by the victim for self-defense. Id. ⤴︎
  15. Tenn. Code Ann. § 36-3-620(b). All other weapons seized shall be returned upon disposition of the case. The seizing officer must append an inventory of all seized weapons to the domestic abuse report that the officer files with his or her supervisor. Id. See Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1317 for state law governing the confiscation and disposition of confiscated firearms. ⤴︎