Federal law prohibits any person from selling or otherwise transferring a firearm or ammunition to any person who has been “adjudicated as a mental defective” or “committed to any mental institution.”1 No federal law requires states to report the identities of these individuals to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) database, which the FBI uses to perform background checks prior to firearm transfers.

After receiving notice of certain judicial determinations or findings, the clerk of superior court in the county where the determination or finding was made must work through the Administrative Office of the Courts to cause a record of that determination or finding to be transmitted to NICS within 48 hours (excluding weekends and holidays).2  The judicial determinations or findings that trigger the NICS reporting requirement are:

  • (1)  A determination that an individual shall be involuntarily committed to a facility for inpatient mental health treatment upon a finding that the individual is mentally ill and a danger to self or others.
  • (2)  A determination that an individual shall be involuntarily committed to a facility for outpatient mental health treatment upon a finding that the individual is mentally ill and, based on the individual’s treatment history, in need of treatment in order to prevent further disability or deterioration that would predictably result in a danger to self or others.
  • (3)  A determination that an individual shall be involuntarily committed to a facility for substance abuse treatment upon a finding that the individual is a substance abuser and a danger to self or others.
  • (4)  A finding that an individual is not guilty by reason of insanity.
  • (5)  A finding that an individual is mentally incompetent to proceed to criminal trial.
  • (6)  A finding that an individual lacks the capacity to manage the individual’s own affairs due to marked subnormal intelligence or mental illness, incompetency, condition, or disease.
  • (7)  A determination to grant a petition to an individual for the removal of firearm prohibitions pursuant to North Carolina or federal law.3

Records of involuntary commitment are accessible only by the sheriff or the sheriff’s designee for the purposes of conducting background checks and are otherwise confidential.4

State law allows a person involuntarily committed for mental health treatment to petition a court for a restoration of his or her eligibility to possess a firearm.5 If the court grants the petition, it must forward the order to NICS for updating of the record.6 State law requires that the clerk, upon receipt of documentation that an affected individual has received a relief from disabilities pursuant to state or applicable federal law, forward the order to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) for updating of the respondent’s record.7

For general information on the background check process and categories of prohibited purchasers or possessors, see the North Carolina Background Checks and North Carolina Prohibited Persons sections.

See our Mental Health Reporting policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. 18 U.S.C. § 922(d)(4). ⤴︎
  2. N.C. Gen. Stat. § 14‑409.43 (recodified from § 122C-54(d1) ). ⤴︎
  3. Id. ⤴︎
  4. N.C. Gen. Stat. § 122C-54(d2). ⤴︎
  5. N.C. Gen. Stat. § 14-409.42 (recodified from § 122C-54.1). ⤴︎
  6. N.C. Gen. Stat. § 14-409.42. ⤴︎
  7. Id. ⤴︎