A person other than a gun dealer who requests a voluntary background check on a prospective firearm transferee and receives notification that the transferee is qualified to complete the transfer is immune from civil liability for any use of the firearm from the time of the transfer.1 See the Oregon Private Sales section for information about this immunity.

Any owner, operator or lessee of a shooting range is immune from civil or criminal liability and shall not be subject to an action for noise or noise pollution, and no court shall enjoin the use or operation of a shooting range, based upon an allegation of nuisance, as long as:

  • The allegation results from the normal and accepted activity on the shooting range;
  • The owner, operator or lessee complied with any applicable noise control law or ordinance existing at the time construction of the shooting range began or no noise control law or ordinance was then existing; and
  • The allegation results from activity on the shooting range occurring between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. or conducted for law enforcement training purposes.2

This immunity does not apply, however, to shooting activity conducted for law enforcement purposes unless such activity is limited to four nights a month and the owner, lessee or operator provides notice of the activity at least one week beforehand by publication in a newspaper of general circulation in the county where the range is located.3

For detailed information about government and private party lawsuits against the gun industry, the status of litigation involving gun industry immunity statutes in various states, or pending gun industry immunity legislation, visit the Brady Center’s Legal Action Project and the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence’s Gun Industry Immunity page.

See our Immunity Statutes policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Or. Rev. Stat. § 166.436(7)(a). ⤴︎
  2. Or. Rev. Stat. §§ 467.131, 467.133. ⤴︎
  3. Or. Rev. Stat. § 467.138. ⤴︎