Open Carrying in Alabama

Alabama does not prohibit the open carrying of firearms in public.

In 2013, the state enacted a law clarifying that openly carrying a handgun in a holster or other secured manner is not, in and of itself, disorderly conduct.1

See our Open Carrying of Firearms in Public policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Ala. Code § 13A-11-7. ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Arizona

Arizona does not prohibit the open carrying of firearms in public.1 In addition, in 2009, Arizona enacted a law explicitly authorizing the “defensive display of a firearm,” in certain situations.2

See our Open Carrying Policy Summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. See Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-3102(B)(3) (exempting visible weapons from Arizona’s meager restrictions on the carrying of firearms in public). ⤴︎
  2. 2009 Ariz. ALS 183 § 1 (codified as Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 13-421). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Arkansas

Arkansas does not allow a handgun to be carried on or about the person, openly or concealed, if it is “readily available for use with a purpose to attempt to unlawfully employ [it] as a weapon against a person.”1 The statute does not apply if, at the time of the act of carrying a handgun, the person is:

  • In his or her own dwelling, place of business (excluding a “vehicular business” such as a taxi cab or other motor vehicle used for commercial purposes;2) or on property in which he or she has a possessory or proprietary interest;
  • Assisting a law enforcement officer, correctional officer, or member of the armed forces acting in the course and scope of official duties pursuant to [their] direction or request;
  • Carrying a weapon when upon a journey;3. However, a firearm may not be carried through a commercial airport at the security checkpoint or in the person’s checked baggage if it is not a lawfully declared weapon.4
  • Hunting game with a handgun under rules and regulations of the Arkansas State Game and Fish Commission, or is en route to or from a hunting area for the purpose of hunting game with a handgun;
  • In a motor vehicle and the holder of a valid license to carry a concealed weapon.5

See our Open Carrying policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Ark. Code Ann. § 5-73-120(a). See also Ark. Att’y Gen. Op. No. 2015-064 (Aug. 28, 2015)(interpreting § 5-73-120(a) to allow a person to carry a handgun openly, but not concealed, without a permit so long as he or she does not have a purpose to attempt to unlawfully employ the handgun against a person. ⤴︎
  2. See Boston v. State, 952 S.W.2d 671 (Ark. 1997). ⤴︎
  3. See Riggins v. State, 703 S.W.2d 463, 464 (Ark. Ct. App. 1986), “[a] journey has long been defined as ‘where one travels a distance from home sufficient to carry him beyond the circle of his neighbors and general acquaintances and outside of the routine of his daily business…'” (citations omitted ⤴︎
  4. Id., See also Ark. Att’y Gen. Op. No. 2015-064 (Aug. 28, 2015)(interpreting the journey exception to apply when a person is in the process of traveling by vehicle outside his or her county and only while the handgun remains in a vehicle. ⤴︎
  5. Ark. Code Ann. § 5-73-120(c). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in California

Please see our Open Carrying policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Although the open carrying of loaded firearms (both handguns and long guns) in public is generally prohibited in California,1 the sheriff of any county with a population under 200,000 people, or the chief of police of a city within that county, may issue licenses to carry a loaded, exposed handgun.2 Those licenses are only valid in the county where they are issued, but are otherwise identical to California concealed weapons license.3 For more information about these licenses, and about the carrying of concealed firearms in California generally, see the Concealed Weapons Permitting in California section.

Prior to 2012, it was legal for a gun owner in California to carry a handgun in public, as long as it was both unloaded and carried in plain sight. However, a 2011 California law, which took effect January 1, 2012, generally prohibits any person from carrying an exposed and unloaded handgun upon his or her person outside of a vehicle in a public place.4 This prohibition is subject to a number of exceptions, including for peace officers, military personnel, licensed hunters, and the carrying of an unloaded handgun in a locked container.5 The violation of this law is a misdemeanor in most cases.6

California law also prohibits the carrying in public, outside of a vehicle and on or about one’s person, of an unloaded long gun in any incorporated city or county.7 This is subject to several exceptions similar to those that apply to the open carrying of handguns in public, including exceptions for peace officers, licensed hunters, and military personnel.8 The violation of this law is a misdemeanor in most cases.9

For more information about carrying firearms in vehicles, see our Guns in Vehicles in California section.

Notes
  1. Cal. Penal Code § 25850. ⤴︎
  2. Cal. Penal Code §§ 26150, 26155. ⤴︎
  3. Id. ⤴︎
  4. Cal. Penal Code §§ 17030, 26350. ⤴︎
  5. Cal. Penal Code §§ 26361-26391. ⤴︎
  6. Cal. Penal Code § 26350(b). ⤴︎
  7. Cal. Penal Code § 26400. ⤴︎
  8. Cal. Penal Code § 26405. ⤴︎
  9. Cal. Penal Code § 26400(b)(1). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Colorado

Colorado does not prohibit the open carrying of handguns or long guns in public, and no permit or license is required.

Local governments may enact regulations prohibiting open carrying of firearms in a building or specific area within the local government’s jurisdiction, as long as signs are posted to that effect.1

For a comprehensive discussion of this issue, see our Open Carrying policy summary.

Notes
  1. Colo. Rev. Stat. § 29-11.7-104. ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Connecticut

Connecticut generally requires that any person seeking to carry a pistol or revolver, whether openly or concealed, obtain a state permit.1 This requirement does not apply to possession within a person’s dwelling or place of business.2

Connecticut has no law that specifically restricts the open carrying of a long gun in public.

See our Open Carrying of Firearms in Public policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Conn. Gen. Stat. § 29-35(a). ⤴︎
  2. Id. ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Florida

Florida generally prohibits the open carrying of a firearm.1 Persons licensed to carry a concealed firearm in Florida who possess a firearm in a concealed manner may “briefly and openly display” the firearm to the ordinary sight of another person, unless the gun is intentionally displayed in an angry or threatening manner, not in necessary self-defense.2

Florida also prohibits the exhibition of a firearm in a rude, careless, angry, or threatening manner, not in necessary self-defense, in the presence of one or more persons.3

See our Open Carrying of Firearms in Public policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Fla. Stat. § 790.053(1). ⤴︎
  2. Id. Florida Statutes § 790.053 does not apply to various military personnel, law enforcement officers, government employees, security guards, messengers, regularly enrolled members of shooting or firearms collecting clubs (while at or going to/from club events), persons “engaged in fishing, camping, or lawful hunting” (or while going to/from such expeditions), or persons possessing arms at their home or place of business, among others. Fla. Stat. § 790.25(3). ⤴︎
  3. Fla. Stat. § 790.10. ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Georgia

Georgia allows any person to openly carry a handgun if the person has a “weapons carry” license.1 Georgia also allows any person to openly carry a long gun.2 In fact, if a long gun is carried while it is loaded, it must be carried openly.3

See our Open Carrying of Firearms in Public policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Ga. Code Ann. §§ 16-11-125.1(5), 16-11-126(c), (h)(1). ⤴︎
  2. Ga. Code Ann. § 16-11-126(b). ⤴︎
  3. Id. ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Hawaii

Hawaii permits the open carrying of handguns on the person with a permit or license.1

Hawaii allows for the open carrying of long guns in public, but only for target shooting purposes or while hunting with a license.2

Notes
  1. Haw. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 134-9(c). See also Haw. Rev. Stat. Ann § 134-9 (licensing provisions for the possession of concealed handguns); Haw. Rev. Stat. Ann. §134-5(c) (licensing of hunters) and Haw. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 134-25 (possession restrictions for handguns). The chief of police may grant a license to carry an unconcealed weapon and ammunition “[w]here the urgency or the need has been sufficiently indicated,” and the applicant is of good moral character, a citizen of the United States, at least 21 years of age, and engaged in the protection of life and property. Haw. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 134-9(a). ⤴︎
  2. Haw. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 134-5(a). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Idaho

Idaho permits the open carrying of handguns on the person with no permit or license.1 Idaho also allows for the carrying of long guns in public.2

Nonetheless, Idaho generally prohibits a “body of men,” except as are regularly recognized and provided for by the laws of the state and of the United States, from parading in public with firearms in any city or town, except that:

  • Associations wholly composed of honorably discharged soldiers or members of the Sons of Veterans or of the Boy Scouts may parade in public with firearms on Memorial Day and certain other occasions; and
  • Students in educational institutions where military science is taught may with the consent of the governor drill and parade with firearms in public under the superintendence of their teachers.3

This section shall not be construed to prevent any other organization authorized by law from parading with firearms.4

 

Notes
  1. Idaho Code Ann. § 18-3302(4). ⤴︎
  2. Id. ⤴︎
  3. Idaho Code Ann. § 46-802. ⤴︎
  4. Id. ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Illinois

Illinois prohibits any person from knowingly carrying or possessing a firearm upon any public place or lands within the corporate limits of a city, village or incorporated town, except on the person’s own land, in his or her own home or fixed place of business, on the land or in the legal dwelling of another person as an invitee with that person’s permission, or when invited on public lands for the purpose of the display of a firearm or the lawful commerce in firearms.1 The statute does not apply to transportation of firearms that are: 1) broken down in a non-functioning state; 2) not immediately accessible; or 3) unloaded and enclosed in a case, firearm carrying box, shipping box, or other container by a person with a currently valid Firearm Owner’s Identification (FOID) card.2 Various additional exceptions apply, including open carrying for hunting and target shooting.3

Regarding handguns, the Firearm Concealed Carry Act, adopted in 2013, provides that an individual with a valid license to carry a concealed firearm may lawfully carry a loaded or unloaded handgun partially concealed on or about his or her person.4 Thus, while a person – whether a concealed carry licensee or not – is prohibited from knowingly carrying a fully unconcealed handgun in public, a concealed carry licensee may lawfully carry a partially exposed handgun.

See our Open Carrying policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. 720 Ill. Comp. Stat. 5/24-1(a)(10). ⤴︎
  2. Id. ⤴︎
  3. See 720 Ill. Comp. Stat. 5/24-2(b). ⤴︎
  4. 430 Ill. Comp. Stat. 66/10(c)(1). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Iowa

Iowa generally allows the open carrying of a handgun with a valid state license.1 No license is required if the person remains outside city limits.2

Iowa allows the open carrying of long guns if:

  • The guns are unloaded;
  • The person remains outside city limits; or
  • The person has a valid state license.3
Notes
  1. Iowa Code § 724.4(1), 724.4(4)(i). ⤴︎
  2. Iowa Code § 724.4(1). ⤴︎
  3. Iowa Code § 724.4(1). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Louisiana

Louisiana does not prohibit the open carrying of firearms in public. Louisiana prohibits the “negligent carrying of a concealed handgun,” which applies regardless of whether a person is licensed under state law, and includes carrying a concealed handgun, intentionally or with criminal negligence:

  • When it is foreseeable that the handgun may discharge, or when others are placed in reasonable apprehension that the handgun may discharge; or
  • When the handgun is being carried, brandished, or displayed under circumstances that create a reasonable apprehension on the part of members of the public or a law enforcement official that a crime is being committed or is about to be committed.1

See our Open Carrying of Firearms in Public policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. La. Rev. Stat. § 40:1382(A). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Maryland

Maryland allows the open carrying of a handgun by a person with a permit to wear, carry or transport a handgun.1

The Secretary of State Police may limit the geographic area, circumstances, or times in which a handgun carry permit is effective in Maryland.2

Maryland does not prohibit the open carrying of long guns in public.

See our Open Carrying policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Md. Code Ann., Crim. Law § 4-203(a), (b)(2). ⤴︎
  2. Md. Code Ann., Pub. Safety § 5-307(b). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Minnesota

Minnesota allows the open carrying of handguns on the person or in a vehicle with a valid permit to carry.1  See Concealed Weapons Permitting in Minnesota for exceptions and permitting information.

Minnesota generally prohibits the open carrying of rifles and shotguns in public.2  This prohibition is subject to the following exceptions:

• The rifle or shotgun is being carried to, from, or at a place where firearms are repaired, bought, sold, traded, or displayed, or where hunting, target shooting, or other lawful activity involving firearms occurs, or at funerals, parades, or other lawful ceremonies;
• The rifle or shotgun is unloaded and in a gun case expressly made for a firearm and which fully encloses the firearm with no portion of the gun exposed;
• The person has a permit to carry a handgun;
• The firearm is an antique firearm that is being carried as a curiosity or for its historical significance or value; or
• The firearm is being transported unloaded and in the closed trunk of a motor vehicle.3

Minnesota allows the open carrying of firearms in a vehicle, if the gun is unloaded and either: 1) in a gun case made to contain the firearm, and the case fully encloses the firearm my being zipped, snapped, buckled, tied or otherwise fastened, without any portion of the gun exposed; or 2) in the closed trunk.4

See our Open Carrying policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Minn. Stat. § 624.714, subd. 1a. ⤴︎
  2. Minn. Stat. § 624.7181, subd. 2. ⤴︎
  3. Minn. Stat. § 624.7181, subd. 1(b). ⤴︎
  4. Minn. Stat. § 97B.045, subd. 1.  Additional exceptions exist for transporting unloaded, uncased long guns while at a shooting range, lawfully hunting or when traveling to or from a hunting site. See Minn. Stat. § 97B.045, subd. 3(a). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Mississippi

Mississippi permits the open carrying of handguns on the person without a permit or license.

Mississippi allows for the open carrying of long guns in public without a permit or license.

Nonetheless, Mississippi prohibits any person who has or is carrying a deadly weapon from exhibiting the weapon in a rude, angry, or threatening manner in the presence of three or more persons.1 A person who is found guilty is subject either to a $500 fine, three months in county jail, or both.2 The state need not prove that the gun or weapon was charged, loaded, or in condition to be discharged for prosecution under this statute.3

Notes
  1. Miss. Code Ann. § 97-37-19. ⤴︎
  2. Id. ⤴︎
  3. Id. ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Missouri

No statutes in Missouri specifically prohibit the open carrying of firearms, and it specifically authorizes any person who has a valid concealed carry endorsement, and who is lawfully carrying a firearm in a concealed manner, to briefly and openly display the firearm to the ordinary sight of another person, unless the firearm is intentionally displayed in an angry or threatening manner, not in necessary self-defense.1. No person may exhibit any weapon readily capable of lethal use in an angry or threatening manner in the presence of one or more persons.2

See our Open Carrying of Firearms in Public policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Mo. Rev. Stat. § 571.037 ⤴︎
  2. Mo. Rev. Stat. § 571.030.1(4). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Montana

Montana permits the open carrying of firearms in public without a permit or license.1 Montana law states in relevant part, “[a]ny person who is not otherwise prohibited from doing so by federal or state law may openly carry a weapon and may communicate to another person the fact that the person has a weapon.”2

See our Open Carrying policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Mont. Code Ann. § 45-3-111. ⤴︎
  2. Id. ⤴︎

Open Carrying in New Hampshire

New Hampshire law prohibits any member of any civil group from assuming any semblance of military organization or character by bearing or possessing rifles, pistols, or military weapons of any kind.1 It is otherwise lawful in New Hampshire to carry an unconcealed, loaded handgun in public without a license.2 New Hampshire has no other law regulating the open carrying of firearms in public.

See our Open Carrying of Firearms in Public policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 111:15. ⤴︎
  2. See N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 159:4. ⤴︎

Open Carrying in New Jersey

New Jersey law does not explicitly prohibit the open carrying of a handgun in public if the possessor has a valid permit to carry a handgun.1

New Jersey allows the open carrying of long guns (i.e. rifles and shotguns) if the possessor has a valid Firearms Purchaser Identification Card.2 New Jersey prohibits any person from knowingly possessing a loaded long gun, with certain exceptions.3

See our Open Carrying policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2C:39-5b. ⤴︎
  2. N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2C:39-5c(1). ⤴︎
  3. N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2C:39-5c(2). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in New York

New York prohibits the possession of a “loaded” handgun outside of the home or place of business without a carry license.1 The state also prohibits any person from possessing a “loaded” short-barreled shotgun or rifle or an assault weapon outside of his or her home or place of business.2 The prohibition on possessing an assault weapon extends to unloaded assault weapons.3 The term “loaded firearm” includes any firearm possessed by a person who also possesses any ammunition which may be discharged by the firearm, whether the firearm is loaded or unloaded.4 New York does not issue licenses to carry handguns openly.5

New York has no law restricting the open carrying of long guns in public.

See our Open Carrying policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. N.Y. Penal Law § 265.03(3). ⤴︎
  2. Id. ⤴︎
  3. N.Y. Penal Law § 265.02(7). ⤴︎
  4. N.Y. Penal Law § 265.00(15). ⤴︎
  5. See N.Y. Penal Code § 400.00. ⤴︎

Open Carrying in North Carolina

North Carolina permits the open carrying of firearms on the person in public with no permit or license required.1

See our Open Carrying Policy Summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. See N.C. Gen. Stat. §14-269 (making it a criminal offense to carry concealed firearms in public without a permit or license). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in North Dakota

North Dakota allows any person to carry an unloaded handgun openly during the day.1 Concealed weapons permit holders may openly carry loaded handguns during the day or night.2 North Dakota allows any person to openly carry a long gun in public at any time.

Notes
  1. N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-03-01(1)(a). ⤴︎
  2. N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-03-01(1), (2)(a). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Oklahoma

Oklahoma law provides that a person is permitted to openly carry both loaded and unloaded firearms without a license for any legitimate purpose, if not in violation of any legislative enactment regarding the use, ownership and control of firearms,1 such as the state’s handgun licensing requirements.2

The law explicitly authorizes open carry of both loaded and unloaded shotguns, rifles, and handguns without a license:

  • When hunting animals or fowl;
  • During competition in or practicing in a safety or hunter safety class, target shooting, skeet, trap or other recognized sporting events;
  • During participation in or in preparation for a military function of the state military forces to be defined as the Oklahoma Army or Air National Guard, Federal Military Reserve and active military forces;
  • During participation in or in preparation for a recognized police function of either a municipal, county or state government as functioning police officials;
  • During a practice for or a performance for entertainment purposes; and
  • For lawful self-defense and self-protection or any other legitimate purpose in or on property that is owned, leased, rented, or otherwise legally controlled by the person.3

Oklahoma also allows the open carrying of an unloaded shotgun, rifle or handgun without a license for any legitimate purpose, if not otherwise in violation of the Oklahoma Firearms Act of 1971, (providing, among other things, for the licensing of persons to carry handguns), including when going to or from the person’s private residence or vehicle, or when a passenger in a vehicle riding to statutorily designated places, such as hunting and target shooting activities, hunter safety courses, or a gunsmith.4

In 2012, Oklahoma amended its laws concerning concealed carry of handguns to also permit valid handgun license holders to carry “unconcealed” handguns for purposes other than those enumerated above.5 Oklahoma law prohibits carrying an unconcealed handgun without a valid handgun license, except where otherwise provided by law.6  But the state now permits valid handgun license holders to openly carry both loaded and unloaded handguns in public, subject to certain rules and limitations.7

“Unconcealed handgun” is defined to include any handgun “carried upon the person in a belt or shoulder holster that is wholly or partially visible, or carried upon the person in a scabbard or case designed for carrying firearms that is wholly or partially visible.”8

For more detailed information about eligibility requirements and application procedures for handgun licenses in Oklahoma, see our Concealed Weapons Permitting in Oklahoma section.

Reciprocity

Oklahoma recognizes any valid open carry weapons permit or license issued by another state.9

Any person entering [Oklahoma] in possession of a firearm authorized for concealed or unconcealed carry upon the authority and license of another state is authorized to continue to carry a concealed or unconcealed firearm and license in [Oklahoma]; provided the license from the other state remains valid. The firearm must either be carried unconcealed or concealed from detection and view, and upon coming in contact with any peace officer of this state, the person must disclose the fact that he or she is in possession of a concealed or unconcealed firearm pursuant to a valid concealed or unconcealed carry weapons permit or license issued in another state.10

For a comprehensive discussion of this issue, see our Open Carrying policy summary.

Notes
  1. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21, § 1289.6. ⤴︎
  2. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21, §§ 1272, 1276. ⤴︎
  3. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21, § 1289.6(A). ⤴︎
  4. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21, § 1289.6(B). ⤴︎
  5. See 2012 OK S.B. 1733. ⤴︎
  6. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit., 21, § 1290.4. ⤴︎
  7. See Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21, § 1290.5. ⤴︎
  8. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 21, § 1290.2(A)(2). ⤴︎
  9. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit, 21, § 1290.26. ⤴︎
  10. Okla. Stat. Ann. tit, 21, § 1290.26(A). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Rhode Island

Rhode Island generally prohibits the open carrying of handguns without the appropriate license or permit, except in a residence, place of business or on land owned by the handgun possessor.1 This prohibition does not apply to concealed handgun license holders.

The open carrying of long guns is generally allowed in Rhode Island. See the Other Location Restrictions in Rhode Island section below for exceptions.

See our Open Carrying policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. R.I. Gen. Laws § 11-47-8(a). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in South Carolina

South Carolina generally prohibits people from openly carrying handguns in public places, but does not restrict open carry of long guns.1

See our Open Carrying of Firearms in Public policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. S.C. Code Ann. §§ 16-23-20, 23-31-217. South Carolina’s statute criminalizing the carrying of handguns, whether openly or concealed, has no exception for a person carrying openly with a concealed weapons permit. ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Tennessee

Tennessee prohibits the possession of a firearm “with the intent to go armed.”1 Persons with handgun carry permits are exempt, and may carry loaded handguns openly.2 The state also allows possession of an unloaded rifle, shotgun or handgun on or about the person where the ammunition for such weapon is not in the immediate vicinity of the person or the weapon.3

See our Open Carrying policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Tenn. Code § 39-17-1307(a)(1). ⤴︎
  2. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1308(a)(2). ⤴︎
  3. Tenn. Code Ann. § 39-17-1308(a)(1). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Texas

Texas generally prohibits the open carrying of handguns, whether loaded or unloaded, on or about the person.1 However, in 2015, Texas enacted a law authorizing valid handgun license holders to carry visible handguns on their person in a shoulder or belt holster, provided that they also carry a valid handgun license.2 Texas also permits open carry of handguns by certain security officers, most persons on their own premises or premises under their control, and persons who are engaging in (including going to or from) a lawful hunting or sporting activity, among others.3 Individuals in motor vehicles and boats are also generally prohibited from carrying a handgun in plain view in Texas, although individuals who are “traveling” are exempt from this prohibition,4, as are valid handgun license holders if they carry the handgun in a shoulder or belt holster.5

Texas also prohibits a handgun licensee from intentionally displaying a handgun which is carried on or about his or her person, unless the handgun is in a shoulder or belt holster.6

The open carrying of long guns is generally allowed in Texas. However, Texas law prohibits the display of a firearm in a public place in a “manner calculated to alarm.”7

Notes
  1. Tex. Penal Code § 46.02. ⤴︎
  2. Tex. Penal Code §§ 46.02(a), 46.15(b)(6). ⤴︎
  3. Tex. Penal Code § 46.15. ⤴︎
  4. Tex. Penal Code §§ 46.02(a-1), 46.15(b)(2). ⤴︎
  5. Tex. Penal Code §§ 46.02(a-1)(1), 46.15(b)(6). ⤴︎
  6. Tex. Penal Code § 46.035(a). ⤴︎
  7. Tex. Penal Code § 42.01(a)(8). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Utah

Utah allows the open carrying of unloaded firearms on the person with no permit or license required.1 Utah allows the open carrying of loaded firearms on the person with a concealed weapons permit.2

Notes
  1. Utah Code Ann. § 76-10-505(1). ⤴︎
  2. Utah Code Ann. §§ 76-10-505(1), 76-10-523. ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Washington

Washington prohibits any person from carrying, exhibiting, displaying or drawing any firearm or other weapon “apparently capable of producing bodily harm, in a manner…that either manifests an intent to intimidate another or that warrants alarm for the safety of other persons.”1 Any person violating this law is criminally liable for a gross misdemeanor and the loss of his or her concealed pistol license, if any. Exceptions include:

  • Persons acting by virtue of their office or public employment who are vested by law with a duty to preserve public safety or order;
  • Any person making or assisting in making a lawful arrest for the commission of a felony;
  • Any person engaged in military activities;
  • Persons acting in self-defense or in defense of another; or
  • Any act committed by a person while in his or her place of abode or fixed place of business.2

See our Open Carrying of Firearms policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

 

Notes
  1. Wash. Rev. Code Ann. § 9.41.270. ⤴︎
  2. Wash. Rev. Code Ann. § 9.41.270(3). ⤴︎

Open Carrying in Wisconsin

Wisconsin does not restrict the carrying of unconcealed, loaded firearms in public.

In addition, in 2011, as part of its new law regarding licenses to carry concealed firearms, Wisconsin enacted a provision that prevents a person from being in violation or charged with a violation of an ordinance of a political subdivision relating to disorderly conduct or other inappropriate behavior for loading, carrying, or going armed with a firearm, without regard to whether the firearm is loaded or is concealed or openly carried, unless other facts and circumstances indicate a criminal or malicious intent on the part of the person.1

See our Open Carrying of Firearms in Public policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Wis. Stat. § 66.0409(6). ⤴︎