Multiple Purchases & Sales of Firearms in California

California law prohibits the purchase of more than one new handgun within any 30-day period.1 Also, licensed firearms dealers may not deliver a handgun to anyone following notification from the California Department of Justice that the purchaser has applied to acquire another handgun within the preceding 30-day period.2 However, these restrictions do not apply to firearm transactions between private parties, even when those transactions are processed as required through a licensed dealer.3

Firearms dealers are required to post conspicuously in their licensed premises a warning, in block letters at least one inch in height, that notifies potential purchasers of the prohibitions on applications to purchase more than one handgun within any 30-day period.4

See our Multiple Purchases or Sales of Firearms policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Cal. Penal Code § 27535. ⤴︎
  2. Cal. Penal Code § 27540(f). ⤴︎
  3. Cal. Penal Code § 27535. There are a number of other exceptions to these restrictions laid out in this section, including, but not limited to, exceptions for law enforcement agencies, private security companies, licensed collectors, and the replacement of a lost or stolen handgun. Id. ⤴︎
  4. Cal. Penal Code § 26835(g). ⤴︎

Multiple Purchases & Sales of Firearms in Maryland

Maryland prohibits any person from purchasing more than one handgun or assault weapon within a 30-day period.1 A person whose handgun or assault weapon is stolen or irretrievably lost and who “considers it essential” that the firearm be replaced immediately may obtain another handgun or assault weapon if he or she provides a copy of an official police report which contains relevant information regarding the owner of the firearm and information regarding the loss or theft of the firearm.2

See our Restrictions on Multiple Purchases or Sales of Firearms policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Md. Code Ann., Pub. Safety § 5-128(b). ⤴︎
  2. Md. Code Ann., Pub. Safety § 5-128(a)(8). See Md. Code Ann., Pub. Safety § 5-129 for additional grounds for allowing multiple purchases of handguns or assault weapons. See also Md. Code Regs. 29.03.01.04. ⤴︎

Multiple Purchases & Sales of Firearms in Minnesota

Minnesota has no law restricting sales or purchases of multiple firearms. Minnesota law affirmatively provides that the transfer of any number of handguns or semiautomatic military-style assault weapons may be treated as a single transfer for purposes of the state background check requirement and that nothing in the Minnesota laws regarding transferee permits and transfers when the transferee does not have a permit limits or restricts the number of such weapons a person may acquire.1

See our Multiple Purchases or Sales of Firearms policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. Minn. Stat. § 624.7132, subd. 9. ⤴︎

Multiple Purchases & Sales of Firearms in New Jersey

New Jersey prohibits licensed retail firearms dealers from knowingly delivering more than one handgun to any person within any 30-day period.1 Moreover, a person may purchase no more than one handgun within any 30-day period.2

See our Multiple Purchases & Sales of Firearms policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2C:58-2a(7). ⤴︎
  2. N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2C:58-3i. The Superintendent of the New Jersey State Police may grant an exemption from this purchaser restriction if the applicant satisfactorily demonstrates that he or she: 1) obtained the handguns through inheritance or intestacy; 2) is a demonstrated collector of handguns; or 3) participates in handgun shooting competitions and needs multiple handguns for such competitive activities. N.J. Stat. Ann. § 2C:58-3.4a. ⤴︎

Multiple Purchases & Sales of Firearms in New York

It is a class C felony in New York to unlawfully sell, exchange, give or dispose of five or more handguns, short-barreled shotguns or rifles, or assault weapons to another person or persons in a period of not more than one year.1 It is a class B felony to unlawfully transfer ten or more such weapons to a person or persons in a period of not more than one year.2 These provisions only apply to otherwise unlawful transfers. In addition, if an unlicensed individual possesses five or more handguns, short-barreled shotguns or rifles, or assault weapons, New York law presumes that the person intends to sell those weapons.3

New York has no other laws limiting the number of firearms that may be sold to a single person in any given period of time.

See our Multiple Purchases or Sales of Firearms policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. N.Y. Penal Law § 265.12. ⤴︎
  2. N.Y. Penal Law §§ 265.12, 265.13. ⤴︎
  3. N.Y. Penal Law § 265.15(6). ⤴︎

Multiple Purchases & Sales of Firearms in the District of Columbia

A person may not register more than one handgun in the District during any 30-day period.1 The Chief of Police may permit a person who is becoming a new District resident to register more than one handgun if the new resident’s handguns were lawfully owned in another jurisdiction for a period of six months prior to the date of the application.2

See our Restrictions on Multiple Purchases or Sales of Firearms policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Notes
  1. D.C. Code Ann. § 7-2502.03(e). See also D.C. Mun. Regs. tit. 24, § 2305.3. ⤴︎
  2. D.C. Code Ann. § 7-2502.03(e). ⤴︎